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Why does the following code not work in getting into an anonymous array?

   my @d = [3,5,7];
   print $(@{$d[0]}[0]);  

   # but print $d[0][0] works.
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The long answer is the first third of Intermediate Perl. –  brian d foy Apr 21 '12 at 12:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you are trying for this:

${$d[0]}[0]

Though of course there's always the syntactic sugar way, too:

$d[0]->[0]
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why does this work, what is going on in that top example? –  Sam Adams Apr 21 '12 at 0:54
2  
@Sam Adams: As the other answers discuss, your @d array has only a single entry inside it - the reference to your 1,2,3 array. So the $d[0] part of the code gets that reference, and the ${...}[0] part accesses the 0th element inside that referenced array. Make sense? –  jwd Apr 21 '12 at 1:12
    
As Joel Berger suggests in his answer, take a look at perlreftut –  jwd Apr 21 '12 at 1:13
1  
@Sam Adams: Your mistake there is writing \$d - that is taking a reference to a variable that is already a reference. If you were to instead write @r = ($d), then that @r would be just like the @d in your original example. –  jwd Apr 21 '12 at 1:29
1  
@Sam Adams: But if you really do want to use \$d, then you could access the first element via ${${$r[0]}}[0], though the syntactic-sugar version starts to look nicer IMO when things get this nested. –  jwd Apr 21 '12 at 1:35
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Script 1 (original)

Because it is invalid Perl code?

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @d = [3,5,7];
print $(@{$d[0]}[0]); 

When compiled (perl -c) with Perl 5.14.1, it yields:

Array found where operator expected at xx.pl line 6, at end of line
    (Missing operator before ?)
syntax error at xx.pl line 6, near "])"
xx.pl had compilation errors.

Frankly, I'm not sure why you expected it to work. I can't make head or tail of what you were trying to do.

The alternative:

print $d[0][0];

works fine because d is an array containing a single array ref. Thus $d[0] is the array (3, 5, 7) (note parentheses instead of square brackets), so $d[0][0] is the zeroth element of the array, which is the 3.

Script 2

This modification of your code prints 3 and 6:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @d = ( [3,5,7], [4,6,8] );
print $d[0][0], "\n";
print $d[1][1], "\n";

Question

So the $ in $d[0] indicates that [3,5,7] is dereferenced to the array (3,5,7), or what does the $ do here? I thought the $ was to indicate that a scalar was getting printed out?

Roughly speaking, a reference is a scalar, but a special sort of scalar.

If you do print "$d[0]\n"; you get output something like ARRAY(0x100802eb8), indicating it is a reference to an array. The second subscript could also be written as $d[0]->[0] to indicate that there's another level of dereferencing going on. You could also write print @{$d[0]}, "\n"; to print out all the elements in the array.

Script 3

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

$, = ", ";

my @d = ( [3,5,7], [4,6,8] );
#print $(@{$d[0]}[0]); 
print @d, "\n";
print $d[0], "\n";
print @{$d[0]}, "\n";
print @{$d[1]}, "\n";
print $d[0][0], "\n";
print $d[1][1], "\n";
print $d[0]->[0], "\n";
print $d[1]->[1], "\n";

Output

ARRAY(0x100802eb8), ARRAY(0x100826d18), 
ARRAY(0x100802eb8), 
3, 5, 7, 
4, 6, 8, 
3, 
6, 
3, 
6, 
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so the $ in $d[0] indicates that [3,5,7] is dereferenced to the array (3,5,7), or what does the $ do here, i thought the $ was to indicate that a scalar was getting printed out? –  Sam Adams Apr 21 '12 at 1:48
    
The $ just means "pick one". So if you have a normal array (not a reference to an array), @a = (1 .. 9), then $a[3] means "pick the one value at index 3", in this case it would be 4 (the arrays are zero-indexed). –  mzedeler Apr 21 '12 at 19:26
1  
So returning to your example, you create an array with only one element: @d = ([3,5,7]), and pick the first element, which is [3,5,7]. Try playing around with plain arrays (and hashes, maybe) first. –  mzedeler Apr 21 '12 at 19:28
    
"Frankly, I'm not sure why you expected it to work" Yeah, I'm sure he knew it wouldn't work but decided to ask the question and just pretend he didn't know why. I think you might interact better with the sociopaths in #perl who lack any ability to put themselves into the shoes of someone learning. –  Joe Nov 12 '13 at 6:33
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The square bracket constructor creates an anonymous array, but you are storing it in another array. This means that you are storing the three element array inside the first element of a one element array. This is why $d[0][0] will return the value 3. To do a single level array use the list constructor:

my @d = (3,5,7);
print $d[0];

If you really mean to create the array inside the outer array then you should dereference the single (scalar) value as

print ${$d[0]}[0].

For more read perldoc perlreftut.

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