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My code below finds all prime numbers below number by creating a list of primes and checking to see if the next potential prime is evenly divisible by any primes in the list.

I'm trying to learn the ins and outs of yield return. Right now I have a List<int> primes that I use inside the function. But I'm returning the same data via yield return. So my question is

Can I access the IEnumerable< int > from inside the function as I am creating it? So I can remove the List< int > primes altogether.

/// <summary>
/// Finds all primes below <paramref name="number"/>
/// </summary>
/// <param name="number">The number to stop at</param>
/// <returns>All primes below <paramref name="number"/></returns>
private static IEnumerable<long> PrimeNumbers(long number)
{
    yield return 2;
    List<long> primes = new List<long>(2);          

    for(long num = 3; num < number; num += 2)
    {

        //if any prime lower then num divides evenly into num, it isn't a prime
        //what I'm doing now
        if(!primes.TakeWhile(x => x < num).Any(x => num % x == 0))
        {
            primes.Add(num);
            yield return num;
        }

        //made-up syntax for what I'd like to do
        if(!this.IEnumerable<long>
                .TakeWhile(x => x < num).Any(x => num % x == 0))
        {
            yield return num;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Short answer: No. Long answer: There are better ways to get primes until a certain number. Check out Sieve of Sundaram: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Sundaram – SimpleVar Apr 21 '12 at 3:44
    
You can also improve by going for Sieve of Eratosthenes: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Eratosthenes and even more by going for Sieve of Atkin: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sieve_of_Atkin Which I think is one of the fastest ways known today to generate prime numbers (if not the fastest) and there is also pseudo code in wiki to help you getting started. – SimpleVar Apr 21 '12 at 3:47
    
@YoryeNathan I saw those sieve's on wikipedia and if I were going to keep this code anywhere important I'd probably use them. This code was more to help train myself how to think in the yield return mindset. – jb. Apr 21 '12 at 3:49
    
So yes, you can't. But what you could do is have a class PrimesGenerator and make that list as a data member, so you don't have to regenerated primes every time again, but remember in another data member the biggest number you've checked and check for more numbers if needed at the current call for GenerateNumbers(max). The idea would be called "caching", since you cache data to be used again and again, for extra efficiency. It would still be as slow as now, but would be TONS faster if you call it for a max that has already been cached. – SimpleVar Apr 21 '12 at 3:53
    
If you want my implementation for exactly that, I'll pastebin it for you. – SimpleVar Apr 21 '12 at 3:55
up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, you cannot do that. The compiler builds a state machine to implement yield return, and the calling code that enumerates through your enumerable is as much a part of its working as your code is. The compiler builds a hidden object that stores the current state of your code, including its call stack and locals, and it calls different pieces of your method as the caller invokes Current and MoveNext. Trying to enumerate your object from the beginning while another enumeration is in progress would mess up the ongoing enumeration, which would not be good.

In this particular case, you don't want it to happen either: the implementation of yield return does not store the values that you produce, so if even if you could access your own IEnumerable while enumerating, it would recursively call back itself multiple times to produce each new item, so it would take you ridiculously long time to produce even a moderate number of primes.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course you can. Recursive or nested enumerations are supposed to be handled automatically, that's part of the beauty of them. This would do it: if(!PrimeNumbers(num).Any(x => num % x == 0)) yield return num. Just tested in LINQPad. However your second point stands, that it is horribly inefficient. You can tell this by simply doing a Console.WriteLine(..) inside the function to see just how many times it is enumerating the same result. – mellamokb Apr 21 '12 at 3:38
1  
@mellamokb That's not accessing itself from the function that creates the sequence. It's accessing an identical copy of itself, with its own state, state machine, and everything else. That's why it does not break, and that's why it's so slow :) – dasblinkenlight Apr 21 '12 at 3:41
    
Ah! I'm on the same page now :) Yes, you can't grab onto previous entries from the same instance because the previous state no longer exists. – mellamokb Apr 21 '12 at 3:42
    
@dasblinkenlight so you are saying that I shouldn't recalculate every single previous prime every time I want to calculate a new prime? haha, that sounds terrible. – jb. Apr 21 '12 at 3:47
    
@jb. Yeah, check out mellamokb's first comment to see just how terrible that would be. In fact, this algorithm for finding primes illustrates an important point about dynamic programming - you "pay" with memory for speeding up calculations. – dasblinkenlight Apr 21 '12 at 3:52

The overall enumerator isn't a container like List<int> primes is. It is a "process" for finding primes. If you recursively use your own process to generate the list of primes to work against for finding the next prime, you will be recursively enumerating the same results over and over again which will be extremely inefficient. Consider what would happen (if you could actually do this) for finding the primes up to 10.

yield return 2
num = 3
IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 3).Any(x => num % x == 0)
    new enumerator
    yield return 2
yield return 3
num = 4
IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 4).Any(x => num % x == 0)
    new enumerator
    yield return 2
    num = 3
    IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 3).Any(x => num % x == 0)
        new enumerator
        yield return 2
    yield return 3
num = 5
IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 5).Any(x => num % x == 0)
    new enumerator
    yield return 2
    num = 3
    IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 4).Any(x => num % x == 0)
        new enumerator
        yield return 2
        num = 3
        IEnumerable<long>.TakeWhile(x => x < 3).Any(x => num % x == 0)
            new enumerator
            yield return 2
        yield return 3
        num = 4
etc.

It's an exponentially increasing enumartion. It's akin to naively finding fibonacci numbers by calculating f(n-1) + f(n-2). You're doing a lot of the same work over and over again, and even more so as you reach higher numbers. The internal List of primes serves as a sort of cache to make your enumeration very efficient.

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