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I am using QT 4.8 (C++) for desktop application project, and writing exception handling which is as follows :

void callerMethod()
{
  try
  {
   method1();
  }
  catch(Exception1& e)
  {
    // display critcal error message
    // abort application
  }
  catch(std::Exception& e)
  {
   // print exception error message
  }
  catch(...)
  {
   // print unknown exception message
  } 
}

void method1()
{
  try
  {
   // some initializations
   // some operations (here exceptions can occur)
   // clean-up code (for successful operation i.e no exception occurred)
  }
  catch(Exception1& e)
  {
   // clean-up code
   throw e;
  }
  catch(Exception2& e)
  {
   // clean-up code
   throw e;
  }
  catch(Exception3& e)
  {
   // clean-up code
   throw e;
  }
  catch(...)
  {
   // clean-up code
   throw;
  }
}

So my question do I need to write the clean-up code in every catch block? Is there any way I can avoid writing repeated code?

NOTE:: [ In method1() ] I want to re-throw exceptions which occurred to my caller.So I can not catch them in single catch block, because then type information will be lost.

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4  
Try to reduce the amount of clean-up code needed by using smart pointers, container classes etc. Ideally there should be no clean-up code at all. –  user763305 Apr 21 '12 at 6:43
    
It appears that what you want to do is simply try { /* may throw */ } catch(specific_exception const& e) { /* terminate */ }. If you don't care for exception types Exception1, Exception2 and so on, then don't catch them. –  Luc Danton Apr 21 '12 at 7:54
1  
Also, even if you do catch by reference, you should rethrow using throw; instead of throw e; to prevent slicing. –  ereOn Apr 21 '12 at 8:25
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Method1 can be much simplified by two concepts:

  1. RAII. Put any clean-up code into destructors, and the clean-up code will be centralized.
  2. Use the unqualified throw, and you won't need to know about the type of exception thrown.

So, method1() should look like:

void method1()
{
     // some initializations of RAII objects
     // some operations (here exceptions can occur)
}

The first catch clause in callerMethod can be removed if you derive Exception1 from std::exception, since the what() method is virtual.

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1  
+1. I wanted to say that. RAII is the solution here. –  Nawaz Apr 21 '12 at 6:47
    
But I want to handle Exception1 separately in callerMethod(). If Exception1 occurred I want to abort the application. –  Anwar Shaikh Apr 21 '12 at 6:52
    
@AnwarShaikh: You can still do that. RAII solves your cleanup problem only. –  Nawaz Apr 21 '12 at 6:54
    
Ok. got it!! Single catch(std::exception& e) and using what() I think i can get the exception type. And I am unaware about RAII, It seems it will solve my problem of clean-up. I will investigate about it. Any good resource link for RAII will help. Thank you.. Thiton and Nawaz. –  Anwar Shaikh Apr 21 '12 at 7:01
    
@AnwarShaikh: Have linked to an appropriate tutorial. –  thiton Apr 21 '12 at 7:06
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If all your clean up code is totally identical, you can do everything in your catch (...) block:

try {
   // code
} catch (...) {
   // cleanup
   throw;
}

If your code varies slightly, you can always call a cleanup function:

try {
   // code
} catch (exc1 ex) {
   cleanup(args);
   // exc1 specific
   throw;
} catch (exc2 ex) {
   cleanup(args);
   // exc2 specific
   throw;
} catch (...) {
   cleanup(args);
   throw;
}
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If I write single catch(..) which throw exception then, In caller method How will I know that which exception was occurred. Because I want to handle Exception1 which abort the application. –  Anwar Shaikh Apr 21 '12 at 6:49
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You should throw exceptions as low as possible and catch them as high as possible in the call chain. This automatically leads to less code duplication, and centralizes error handling. You are throwing/catching all in one place, which seems a bit ... forced.

I often do this kind of thing (especially for program-ending exceptions:

int main()
try
{
    function_calls_that_may_throw();
    // ...
}
catch(my_exception& e)
{
    e.do_exception_stuff();
}
catch(std::exception& e)
{
    std::cout << e.what();
}
catch(...)
{
    std::cout << "Something bad happened.\n";
}

This is only possible for throwing exceptions you don't plan on handling better or retrying the failed operation or something.

The pro of this approach is that all/most error handling code is at the top-level of your program, and all the functions in the call chain don't have to worry one bit about this stuff, all they do is throw an exception when they feel like it.

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