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I have build my site using entity and repository pattern with ninject injection. My problem is my connections don't seem to get disposed. I have around 30 repositories (one for each table) and I get sql expiration timout preety quick. I can't use the regular using statement because the code recognize only the interface before the injection. (in each controler I have my repositories interface instances which get injected via ninject).

I have searched the net but couldn't find a solution that was accurate for me. can anyone please help me? code example:

this is in the ninject controller under addBindings():

 ninjectKernel.Bind<IMovieRepository>().To<MovieRepository>().InRequestScope();

and one of my repositories:

 public class MovieRepository : IMovieRepository, IDisposable 
        {
         private Entities dataContext = new Entities();
         public System.Data.Entity.DbContext DbContext 
         {
            get { return dataContext ?? (dataContext = new Entities()); } 
         }
         public void Dispose() { dataContext.Dispose(); }
        }

and in the Global.asax file:

 ControllerBuilder.Current.SetControllerFactory(new NinjectControllerFactory() as IControllerFactory);
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Could you show your Ninject bindings and a sample of one of your repository classes? I am interested as to how the lifecycle of your DbContext is being managed. –  ngm Apr 21 '12 at 8:40
    
Where are you doing that? In Global.asax? How you setting up Ninject in the first place? Maybe update your question with this code if you can. –  ngm Apr 21 '12 at 10:47
    
@ngm: this is in the ninject controller under addBindings: ninjectKernel.Bind<IMovieRepository>().To<DbMovieRepository>().InRequestScope(); and one of my repositories: public class MovieRepository : IMovieRepository, IDisposable { private Entities dataContext = new Entities(); public System.Data.Entity.DbContext DbContext { get { return dataContext ?? (dataContext = new Entities()); } } public void Dispose() { dataContext.Dispose(); } } –  mashta gidi Apr 21 '12 at 10:49
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2 Answers

I would guess that your repositories (and therefore presumably your DbContexts) are being bound in transient scope, which I believe means a new one will be created every time Ninject needs to inject one somewhere. I'm not certain but I'm guessing then that these are all staying around for the lifetime of your application and maybe not being disposed.

Try binding your repositories in request scope, so that they are created and disposed per web request.

e.g.

Bind<IFooRepository>().To<ConcreteFooRepository>().InRequestScope();

From the Ninject wiki:

There are four built-in scopes available in Ninject:

  • Transient - A new instance of the type will be created each time one is requested. (This is the default scope). Binding method is .InTransientScope()
  • Singleton - Only a single instance of the type will be created, and the same instance will be returned for each subsequent request. Binding method is .InSingletonScope()
  • Thread - One instance of the type will be created per thread. Binding method is .InThreadScope()
  • Request - One instance of the type will be created per web request, and will be destroyed when the request ends. Binding method is .InRequestScope()
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actaully I used inRequestScope in ninject version 2, but I assume that since I move my instance from the controller to different parts of the site, ninject doesn't know where the scope ends exactly. –  mashta gidi Apr 21 '12 at 10:36
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This kind of problem usually occur if long living objects depend on shorter living objects. E.g. A singleton service uses a repository in request scope.

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1  
care to elaborate? –  mashta gidi Apr 22 '12 at 20:44
1  
If a long living object e.g a service in singleton scope depends on a shorter lived object, this will work for the first request. After that first request the object will be disposed by ninject, because the scope ended. On the next request the service will try to use that disposed object causing the exception. –  Remo Gloor Apr 22 '12 at 20:51
    
thank you Remo for your tip. what I'm using is InRequestScope(). this way I don't get the null exception of the disposed object. thanks for your –  mashta gidi Apr 23 '12 at 6:55
    
@Ad Alokbi aside from saying thank you, we also use the up arrow around here. This means answers get sorted according to merit. As the Original Poster, your opinion is about as valuable as anyone's looking at this. –  Ruben Bartelink Apr 23 '12 at 7:49
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