Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to edit only one value in an existing JSON file.

Is there any way to do that without parsing and re-writing the whole file? (I use Jackson Streaming API to generate and parse the file, but I'm not sure that Streaming API can do that).

my Example.json file contains the following:

{ 
"id" : "20120421141411",
"name" : "Example",
"time_start" : "2012-04-21T14:14:14"
}

Example given: I want to edit the value of the "name" from "Example" to "other name".

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not that I know of; either at JSON level, or at file level -- unless length of the values happened to be exactly same, underlying file system typically requires rest of the file to be rewritten from point of change.

You can read and write file using Streaming API, replacing value on the go; see JsonGenerator.copyCurrentEvent(jp) to simplify the task -- it just copies the input event exactly as is. For everything except for replacing particular value, you can call that; and for value, can call JsonGenerator.writeString().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks you so much –  April Smith Apr 24 '12 at 2:48
    
i'm confused. this copies it to the generator? what is an event? I have similar issue and need to modify json string but i can't figure this out from your answer. –  simgineer Feb 1 '13 at 23:52
    
This is for Jackson Streaming API, where JsonParser is used to read JSON as a sequence of events (JsonToken); and JsonGenerator to write JSON content as similar events. You can simply connect parser to generator and let it copy events for the most part; except add/remove/replace events you want such modified. I noticed that I had forgotten JsonParser example above; it is obviously needed to let generator know where to get its input. –  StaxMan Feb 2 '13 at 4:31

If the file is small and the input value you're looking to replace is unique "enough", and you're open to quick-and-dirty, use apache commons-exec or something to shell out:

bash$> echo '{ 
        "id" : "20120421141411",
        "name" : "Example",
        "time_start" : "2012-04-21T14:14:14"
    }' | sed -e 's/Example/othername/'

outputs:

{ 
    "id" : "20120421141411",
    "name" : "othername",
    "time_start" : "2012-04-21T14:14:14"
}

Use cat file | sed ... if you know the path to the file.

If you really wanted to edit the file in-place, only writing to those bytes you want to change, it's only possible if the data you are writing will not overwrite subsequent data in the file. You are much better off going with one of the solutions above.

Suppose the JSON file were massive (>1GB?), then would this technique make sense? NO, what the heck are you doing with a JSON file that big? Split it up! But for sake of argument...

You really want to do it, so you hook into a JSON parser to keep track of the byte offset within the file and be able to tie that back to the object representing the JsonNode you will be manipulating. You might end up writing your own parser at this point; JSON grammar is intentionally simple. Then you'd just open the file, skip to that offset, and write the JsonNode data... unless it will overwrite something after it (do you pre-populate the file with buffer of space after every value, just in case? hmmm... this is starting to sound like a database problem). In that case, you'll end up rewriting the entire rest of the file as the larger value "pushes" everything else downward. Not a big deal if the edits are always near the end of file. But if they are random, your performance is doomed. You'll bottleneck serializing writes.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.