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From Wikipedia:

"Anindya De, Chandan Saha, Piyush Kurur and Ramprasad Saptharishi[11] gave a similar algorithm using modular arithmetic in 2008 achieving the same running time. However, these latter algorithms are only faster than Schönhage–Strassen for impractically large inputs."

I would be very interested in the size of such impractically large integers.

Maybe someone did implement both algorithms in a certain way and could do some benchmarks?

Thanks

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Fürer's algorithm and it's modular equivalent... very deep research topic. Nobody actually knows how big the cross-over point is. And it's likely to be highly sensitive to hardware and implementation details. In any case, that might be completely irrelevant since that cross-over point is likely to be well beyond 64-bit computing limits. –  Mysticial Apr 21 '12 at 9:04
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Basically, the cross-over point is so large that it would require more memory than what 64-bit allows. And since 128-bit hardware is virtually non-existent, it's pointless to speculate exactly where that cross-over point is because it will be extremely sensitive to details of the (currently non-existent) hardware. Even a factor of 2 in the big-O constant could mean a several orders of magnitude difference in the cross-over point. –  Mysticial Apr 21 '12 at 9:29
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You need to find n such that log(log n)>c2^(log* n), where c is quotient of the constants. Assuming that c=100, you get n > 2^(2^100), a number not that will not fit in 64 bit hardware. I speculate the constant will be higher than 100. –  sdcvvc Apr 21 '12 at 9:43
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@TeaBee: That doesn't mean that an implementation of Fürer exists that's actually faster for some testable input. Maybe you have a misunderstanding in what the O-notation means: The two algorithms could well differ by a constant factor that's in the billions or even larger. –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 9:45
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I'm familiar with both Schönhage-Strassen and Fürer's algorithm. I've implemented Schönhage-Strassen and I understand how Fürer's algorithm works. It's very possible that the cross-over point is so high that a computer capable of holding the parameters will be larger than the size of the observable universe. That's the problem when you have complexities that differ by less than a logarithm. It takes exponentially large input sizes to compensate even for small differences in the Big-O constant. In this case, Fürer's algorithm is known to have a very very very large Big-O constant. –  Mysticial Apr 21 '12 at 10:03

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Fürer's algorithm and it's modular equivalent (DSKS) are very deep research topics and, for now, remain only as academic interest. Nobody actually knows how big the cross-over point is. And in all likeliness it doesn't matter because that cross-over point is likely to be well beyond 64-bit computing limits.

I've implemented Schönhage-Strassen before and I understand how Fürer's algorithm works. So I'm quite familiar with both of them. I can say it's very possible that the cross-over point between Schönhage-Strassen and Fürer's algorithm is so high that a computer capable of holding the parameters will be larger than the size of the observable universe.

That's the problem when you have complexities that differ by less than a logarithm. It takes exponentially large input sizes to compensate even for small differences in the Big-O constant.

In this case, Fürer's algorithm is known to have a very very very large Big-O constant.

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