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The following code is a part of using google api access. After connectDb(), there is a line

$q = sprintf("select * from users where google_user_id='%s' limit 1", r($me->id));

...// and more afterwards

$q = sprintf("insert into users (google_user_id, google_email, google_name, google_picture, google_access_token, created, modified) values ('%s','%s','%s','%s','%s',now(),now());",
    r($me->id),
    r($me->email),
    r($me->name),
    r($me->picture),
    r($me->access_token));

And I am not sure what r($me->id) is doing. What is "r" for?

I appreciate any help. Thanks in advance.

More detailed codes are here.

 // get profile   
$params = array(
    'client_id' => CLIENT_ID,
    'client_secret' => CLIENT_SECRET,
    'code' => $_GET['code'],
    'redirect_uri' => SITE_URL.'redirect.php',
    'grant_type' => 'authorization_code'
);
$url = 'https://accounts.google.com/o/oauth2/token';

$curl = curl_init();
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POST, 1);
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, http_build_query($params));
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);

$rs = curl_exec($curl);
curl_close($curl);

$json = json_decode($rs);

$url = 'https://www.googleapis.com/oauth2/v1/userinfo?access_token='.$json->access_token;
$me = json_decode(file_get_contents($url));

// enter into DB

connectDb();

$q = sprintf("select * from users where google_user_id='%s' limit 1", r($me->id));
$rs = mysql_query($q);
$user = mysql_fetch_assoc($rs);

if (empty($user)) {
    $q = sprintf("insert into users (google_user_id, google_email, google_name, google_picture, google_access_token, created, modified) values ('%s','%s','%s','%s','%s',now(),now());",
        r($me->id),
        r($me->email),
        r($me->name),
        r($me->picture),
        r($me->access_token));
    $rs = mysql_query($q);
    $q = sprintf("select * from users where id=%d", mysql_insert_id());
    $rs = mysql_query($q);
    $user = mysql_fetch_assoc($rs);
}
share|improve this question
    
Must be a wrapper around mysql_real_escape_string(). Should use PDO instead. –  kapa Apr 21 '12 at 9:58
    
I'd say a function defined somewhere in the script or in an included file. It' a very poor name for a function. –  JE SUIS CHARLIE Apr 21 '12 at 9:58
    
it's a php function I guess. Not a native function so the code for this function shall stand somewhere. Check your includes to find it or use your IDE. Also I guess this function might content some native php functiosn like "htmlspecialchars" or same family. –  hornetbzz Apr 21 '12 at 10:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Whilst one can't be sure as it's not present in the code, it's being used to SQL-escape values injected into a query... so my guess is that it has been defined as a shortcut alias for one of the string escaping functions. eg

function r($s) {
    return mysql_real_escape_string($s);
}

As typing out the name mysql_real_escape_string every time gets a bit boring.

Escaping prevents SQL-injection attacks. Parameterised queries are generally considered a more sustainable way to tackle it, but in PHP that means changing to the mysqli or PDO interfaces.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, I missed another file and I found function r($s) { return mysql_real_escape_string($s); } –  shin Apr 21 '12 at 10:01
    
So they just took a function with a self-explanatory if somewhat lengthy name and wrapped it with one so short as to be useless? Terrible coding practice. –  Garrett Albright Apr 21 '12 at 12:18
1  
Essentially yes. I don't think it's indefensible for a very-commonly used function to have such a short name, as long as it's docced to make it clear—I often use h as a shortcut for echo htmlspecialchars. r is a strange choice of name though nonetheless. Having to use one function so often that it pays to give it a tiny name is probably a sign that there's something wrong that a framework should be handling automatically: in this case clearly parameterisation is the better answer; in the case of htmlspecialchars it's a failing of the templating syntax that it's not escaped by default. –  bobince Apr 24 '12 at 14:41

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