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Are there any CSS selectors (CSS3+ is fine) that will apply certain styles to an element when there is only a single occurrence?

For example, the following CSS rule:

border: 1px solid black;

...would only apply to .info if there is only one occurrence of .info in the HTML.

So,

<p class="info">This would have a border because there is only one</p>

and,

<p class="info">This would not have a border because there are two</p>
<p class="info">And neither would this</p>

I'm guessing I'm going to have to either programatically apply an additional class such as: .single-occurrence or count the number of occurrences with Javascript?

Edit:

Let me just clear a few things up.

When I mention Javascript as a solution to what I'm trying to do - that does not mean I'm going to use it. I try to avoid JS for anything that is not behaviour. So I don't want a Javascript answer, that's incredibly easy to accomplish - my question is about CSS.

Also, to those getting confused: the reason why there would on occasion be only a single class on the page, is because the actual class I'm using is: search-result. Sometimes there would only be one result. But just because there's only one does not mean that the item cannot be part of the class of objects known as search-result. Semantically (and logically), of course there can be a class of one item. Sometimes, I think people should think a little more about semantics, instead of applying blanket rules.

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I'm of the firm belief that there is no solution that meets the requirements of your question. CSS simply does not provide for this case, either in the spec or in practical implementation. – michaelward82 Apr 22 '12 at 3:29
    
@michaelward82. Thanks, I suspected as much. – Chris Harrison Apr 22 '12 at 3:35
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Depending on the structure of your page, you might be able to use the :only-of-type pseudo-class, which matches if the element has no siblings of the same tag name. I don't think there's a way to get more specific than that.

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That seems to work. So now when there is only one search result I can style it like this:#search-results .search-result:only-of-type { border: 0; } – Chris Harrison Apr 22 '12 at 8:25

There is no CSS solution for this. I'd go with your JavaScript idea. If you were to use jQuery, you could use something like:

$('.info').length

List of CSS3 pseudo-classes here: http://reference.sitepoint.com/css/css3psuedoclasses

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Again... stackoverflow.com/questions/2826791/… – Madara Uchiha Apr 21 '12 at 17:07
2  
@Truth, while I appreciate your concern for the overuse of jQuery, am suggesting this solution as 1 option in case he's already using jQuery. Sure, there are other of libraries out there and he might be using, but I wasn't about to post an example for every one. Why use a library at all? Sure, create your own getElementsByClassName function. But all of that is the OP's prerogative. – Ayman Safadi Apr 21 '12 at 18:11

How about this solution.

CSS

.info.highlight { border: 1px solid black }

JavaScript (using jQuery)

var $info = $('.info');
if ($info.length === 1) { $info.addClass('highlight'); }

Demonstration: http://jsfiddle.net/joshdavenport/YdbuB/

share|improve this answer
4  
-1. OP stated he's looking for a CSS selector. He also mentioned he knows that if there isn't one he'll have to resort to JavaScript. Not only you put JavaScript on a css question, you've put jQuery too! stackoverflow.com/questions/2826791/… – Madara Uchiha Apr 21 '12 at 17:00
    
My question is about CSS, not Javascript. Thanks though. – Chris Harrison Apr 22 '12 at 3:27

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