Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I have this general purpose HashTable class I'm developing, and I want to use it generically for any number of incoming types, and I want to also initialize the internal storage array to be an array of LinkedList's (for collision purposes), where each LinkedList is specified ahead of time (for type safety) to be of the type of the generic from the HashTable class. How can I accomplish this? The following code is best at clarifying my intent, but of course does not compile.

public class HashTable<K, V>
{
    private LinkedList<V>[] m_storage;

    public HashTable(int initialSize)
    {
        m_storage = new LinkedList<V>[initialSize];
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/529085/… –  skaffman Jun 22 '09 at 7:27
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Generics in Java doesn't allow creation of arrays with generic types. You can cast your array to a generic type, but this will generate an unchecked conversion warning:

public class HashTable<K, V>
{
    private LinkedList<V>[] m_storage;

    public HashTable(int initialSize)
    {
        m_storage = (LinkedList<V>[]) new LinkedList[initialSize];
    }
}

Here is a good explanation, without getting into the technical details of why generic array creation isn't allowed.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Thanks for the great response and resource. –  Ben Lakey Jun 22 '09 at 7:39
    
You can add @SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"}) to the assignment to keep the compiler quiet. –  Aaron Digulla Jun 22 '09 at 8:00
    
The page you linked to is actually not about the same thing. This section of Angelika Langer's Generics FAQ explains it well. –  Paul Bellora Nov 8 '12 at 20:11
    
If you use @SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"}) before this command to keep the compiler quiet, you can also just do @SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"}) m_storage = new LinkedList[initialSize]; which is a bit simpler and technically no difference to @SuppressWarnings({"unchecked"}) m_storage = (LinkedList<V>[]) new LinkedList[initialSize];. But I have to agree: neither of those are really nice :-( –  Daniel Alder Nov 3 '13 at 12:11
    
The link to the explanation is broken –  Daniel Alder Nov 3 '13 at 12:15
add comment

Also, you can suppress the warning on a method by method basis using annotations:

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public HashTable(int initialSize) {
    ...
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.