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I'm currently working on a project where we have a lot of dependencies. I would like to compile all the referenced dll's into the .exe much like you would do with embedded resources. I have tried ILMerge but it can't handle .xaml resources.

So my question is: Is there a way to merge a WPF project with multiple dependencies into a single .exe?

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Are you looking only for free apps or you can pay few bucks for it? –  Hemant Jun 22 '09 at 7:19
    
If the app is good enough and can handle WPF we would probably consider commercial apps as well. –  Farawin Jun 22 '09 at 7:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

.NET reactor has the feature of merging the assemblies and its not very expensive.

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Can it handle WPF projects as well? It sure looks promising. –  Farawin Jun 22 '09 at 7:49
    
Has anyone succeeded in using Reactor to solve their WPF merging problems? At $180 it's actually affordable as a product for a poor shareware developer like myself, unlike SmartAssembly. –  chaiguy Jul 30 '10 at 22:46
    
Well I tried it out and it works! However I still want to see if I can get things working without having to shell out almost $200. –  chaiguy Jul 30 '10 at 23:21
    
I tried it on Net4.0 WPF assemblies and it does not work for me -- all my merged app does it displaying info the merging was done by unregistered version of .Net Reactor. –  greenoldman Aug 17 '10 at 8:40
    
Thanks for this link, very nice bit of software! –  Andy Aug 16 '13 at 15:48

http://www.digitallycreated.net/Blog/61/combining-multiple-assemblies-into-a-single-exe-for-a-wpf-application

This worked like a charm for me :) and its completely free.

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Nice solution. Had some trouble when loading dlls using .LoadFrom() because if different context but otherwise a nice and clean way of automating the merge directly in VS. –  jishi May 10 '11 at 12:50
    
Is this solution MSBuild specific? –  TarunG Jul 6 '11 at 6:30
    
yea I think it is. –  Wegged Jul 6 '11 at 13:33

Costura is an open source tool that is designed to handle merging wpf assemblies.

https://github.com/Fody/Costura#how-it-works

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1  
Specifically, it is a Nu-Get package you install to your project and it causes the wpf assemblies to be merged without any further intervention on your part. –  Techrocket9 Jul 2 at 20:03
    
Works pretty well. Install the Nuget and done. –  Ricardo Polo Aug 10 at 22:02
    
Neat. Definitely best solution here at the time. Also performs some optimizations regarding size, it's only 50% of the ILMerged exe's size. –  Sebastian Sep 2 at 18:23

{smartassembly} is the BEST ever product. It can obsfucate or embedd your dlls.

Try this: http://www.smartassembly.com/

You can also do a lot of improvings on your application so it will run faster.

And yes. You can use it for WPF.

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I tried this product and it worked correctly where ILMerge failed. It was very easy to use. –  Duncan Edwards Jan 29 '10 at 11:12
    
We use it with a Wpf application and it works great... –  Jason Stevenson May 5 '10 at 19:00
    
Looks impressive, but it does not let you to point out what files you would like to assembly (it limits you to detected files). As the effect all resource dlls (with translated strings) are left alone, and you still have one executable with additional dlls. I thought that the point of merging would be one executable and 0 dlls. –  greenoldman Aug 17 '10 at 9:00

As posted on ILMerge website, treat those dlls as ressources, from Jeffrey Richter here :

Many applications consist of an EXE file that depends on many DLL files. When deploying this application, all the files must be deployed. However, there is a technique that you can use to deploy just a single EXE file. First, identify all the DLL files that your EXE file depends on that do not ship as part of the Microsoft .NET Framework itself. Then add these DLLs to your Visual Studio project. For each DLL file you add, display its properties and change its “Build Action” to “Embedded Resource.” This causes the C# compiler to embed the DLL file(s) into your EXE file, and you can deploy this one EXE file. At runtime, the CLR won’t be able to find the dependent DLL assemblies, which is a problem. To fix this, when your application initializes, register a callback method with the AppDomain’s ResolveAssembly event. The code should look something like this:

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.AssemblyResolve += (sender, args) => {

   String resourceName = "AssemblyLoadingAndReflection." +

      new AssemblyName(args.Name).Name + ".dll";

   using (var stream = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetManifestResourceStream(resourceName)) {

      Byte[] assemblyData = new Byte[stream.Length];

      stream.Read(assemblyData, 0, assemblyData.Length);

      return Assembly.Load(assemblyData);

   }

}; 

Now, the first time a thread calls a method that references a type in a dependent DLL file, the AssemblyResolve event will be raised and the callback code shown above will find the embedded DLL resource desired and load it by calling an overload of Assembly’s Load method that takes a Byte[] as an argument.

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Try .Netz ( http://madebits.com/netz/ ) - it's free (as in beer) and does some nice things if you're target is an exe.

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NetZ is a great option for batch command controlling (so you can build it into your visual studio easily on the post build event). However, on WPF it does not work for me: My problem case –  modiX Sep 26 '13 at 15:43

Here is a tweaked version of the quoted code from Matthieu that doesn't require knowing the namespace to extract the code. For WPF, put this in the application startup event code.

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.AssemblyResolve += (s, args) =>
{
    // Note: Requires a using statement for System.Reflection and System.Diagnostics.
    Assembly assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
    List<string> embeddedResources = new List<string>(assembly.GetManifestResourceNames());
    string assemblyName = new AssemblyName(args.Name).Name;
    string fileName = string.Format("{0}.dll", assemblyName);
    string resourceName = embeddedResources.Where(ern => ern.EndsWith(fileName)).FirstOrDefault();
    if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(resourceName))
    {
        using (var stream = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(resourceName))
        {
            Byte[] assemblyData = new Byte[stream.Length];
            stream.Read(assemblyData, 0, assemblyData.Length);
            var test = Assembly.Load(assemblyData);
            string namespace_ = test.GetTypes().Where(t => t.Name == assemblyName).Select(t => t.Namespace).FirstOrDefault();
#if DEBUG
            Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("\tNamespace for '{0}' is '{1}'", fileName, namespace_));
#endif
            return Assembly.Load(assemblyData);
        }
    }

    return null;
}; 

To make them available at compile time, I create a folder named ExternalDLLs and copy the dlls there and set them to EmbeddedResource as noted above. To use them in your code, you still need to set a reference to them, but set Copy local to False. To get the code to compile cleanly without errors you also need to set using statments in your code to the namespaces of the dlls.

Here is a little utility that spins through the embedded resource names and displays their namespaces in the output window.

private void getEmbeddedResourceNamespaces()
{
    // Note: Requires a using statement for System.Reflection and System.Diagnostics.
    Assembly assembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
    List<string> embeddedResourceNames = new List<string>(assembly.GetManifestResourceNames());
    foreach (string resourceName in embeddedResourceNames)
    {
        using (var stream = assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(resourceName))
        {
            Byte[] assemblyData = new Byte[stream.Length];
            stream.Read(assemblyData, 0, assemblyData.Length);
            try
            {
                var test = Assembly.Load(assemblyData);
                foreach (Type type in test.GetTypes())
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("\tNamespace for '{0}' is '{1}'", type.Name, type.Namespace));
                }
            }
            catch 
            {
            }
        }
    }
}
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