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I am trying to read a 2d array of comma separated values from a file into a list. I have the following problem, how do I get rid of trailing newlines? This is what I mean. This is one row I have read.

['0', '0', '0', '1', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '0', '1', '1', '1\n']

Presently, I have the following in code:

ins = open( "parseTable.txt", "r" )
parseTable = []
for line in ins:
    row = line.split(',')
    parseTable.append(row)

Thanks everybody for the tips. I did the following to make do. thanks for all the tips. I did the following to make do.

ins = open( "parseTable.txt", "r" )
parseTable = []
for line in ins:
    row = line.split(',')
    parseTable.append(map(int,line.split(',')))
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maybe ast.literal_eval can help –  gnibbler Apr 21 '12 at 12:16
1  
@frodo Glad you found the code and tips provided helpful. You may want to upvote the answers you found useful, and select one of them as your answer via the checkmark. –  Levon Apr 22 '12 at 0:55

3 Answers 3

With with statement, list comprehension, and csv module

import csv
with open("parseTable.txt") as f:
    parseTable = [x.rstrip() for x in row for row in csv.reader(f)]

Edit:

  1. with statement will close you file automatically when exception raises while opening/processing file. It may not be necessary in your case but you should remember of this possibility. Using context managers is a good practice [ More ]

  2. List comprehension usually makes your script faster but sometimes harder for readability. Anyway you have to understand and use it.

  3. I don't mean anything in favour csv module or against opening files with built-in functions and splitting rows with split(','). It's your choice, I just suggest the alternative.

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This worked for me ins = open( "parseTable.txt", "r" ) parseTable = [] for line in ins: row = line.split(',') parseTable.append(map(int,line.split(','))) –  frodo Apr 21 '12 at 12:42
    
I added some explanations –  San4ez Apr 21 '12 at 12:58

The only change necessary to your existing code is the use of the rstrip() function on your line before you split() it. e.g.,

ins = open( "parseTable.txt", "r" )  # the "r" is not really needed - default 
parseTable = []

for line in ins:
   row = line.rstrip().split(',')  # <- note use of rstrip()
   parseTable.append(row)

This will eliminate the trailing newline as requested.


A simple example, step by step:

In [2]: s = 'this is a test\n'

In [3]: s
Out[3]: 'this is a test\n'

In [4]: s.rstrip()
Out[4]: 'this is a test'

So in order for the changes to stick you need to make assignments

In [5]: s = s.rstrip()

In [6]: s = s.split()

In [7]: s
Out[7]: ['this', 'is', 'a', 'test']

Alternatively in one step:

 In [11]: s = s.rstrip().split()

 In [12]: s
 Out[12]: ['this', 'is', 'a', 'test']
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ur hand is fast ... –  fanlix Apr 21 '12 at 12:09
t = []
for line in open("txt", "r").readlines():
    t.append(line.rstrip().split(','))
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