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Is there a C# construct like the switch statement that allows control to fall through the next level? I have something like this:

    public static IEnumerable<string> SeverityOrHigher(string severity)
    {
        var result = new List<string>();

        switch (severity.ToUpper())
        {
            case "ALL":
                result.Add("ALL");
            case "DEBUG":
                result.Add("DEBUG");
            case "INFO":
                result.Add("INFO");
            case "WARN":
                result.Add("WARN");
            case "ERROR":
                result.Add("ERROR");
            case "FATAL":
                result.Add("FATAL");
            case "OFF":
                result.Add("OFF");
            default:
                break;
        }

        return result;
    }

...which clearly does not work in C#, (Control cannot fall through from one case label...) yet it seems to me like it should. I know it expects breaks in there, but that would not give me the data flow I'm looking for. What can be done to make this happen the way I'd like?

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3  
What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  ChrisF Apr 21 '12 at 12:07
    
You could use goto case "DEBUG" etc, but then you're using goto so Dijkstra will hate you. –  harold Apr 21 '12 at 12:08
    
Looks like an enum would better serve your root requirement here. –  Andrew Barber Apr 21 '12 at 12:08
1  
@ChrisF, I would hope it would be clear what I am trying to achieve. Given a specific Severity level, I want an enumerable list of that Severity level and all severities higher than it. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:10
1  
Well it is clear now you've explained it. –  ChrisF Apr 21 '12 at 12:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

In your case you can emulate "falling case" with a little bit of LINQ:

public static IEnumerable<string> SeverityOrHigher(string severity)
{
    var result = new List<string>() 
        { "ALL", "DEBUG", "INFO", "WARN", "ERROR", "FATAL", "OFF" };
    return result.SkipWhile(l => l != severity.ToUpper()).ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks... interesting. Still not the C# language construct I was hoping for, but it seems cleaner than goto statements in a switch clause. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:13
    
LINQ is the way to go. –  Patrick Magee Apr 21 '12 at 12:18
    
Maybe it's a little bit "clever" but I think it's still more readable than using goto case. –  nemesv Apr 21 '12 at 12:19
    
Readable... meh. I would say the goto case is more readable. But I don't like the idea of typing the word goto into a project anywhere. Call me old-fashioned. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:26
1  
"But I don't like the idea of typing the word goto into a project anywhere. Call me old-fashioned" << Gotos are very old-school. I shall call you new fashioned instead. –  Greg D Apr 21 '12 at 19:07

Along with gotos, etc, you could do with this an enum and a bit of linq:

    public static IEnumerable<Severity> SeverityOrHigher(Severity severity)
    {
        var value = (int) severity;

        return Enum.GetValues(typeof (Severity))
            .Cast<int>()
            .Where(i => i >= value)
            .Select(i => (Severity) i);
    }

    public enum Severity
    {
        All = 0,
        Trace = 1,
        Debug = 2,
        Information = 3,
        Warning = 4,
        Error = 5,
        Fatal = 6
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about doing this... unfortunately it implied parsing my log severity (which is a string via log4net) with every entry and I shied away from that. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:18

It is not the optimal solution but you could use the goto statement like this:

switch (severity.ToUpper())
{
  case "ALL":
    result.Add("ALL");
    goto case "DEBUG";
  case "DEBUG":
    result.Add("DEBUG");
    goto case "INFO";
  case "INFO":
    result.Add("INFO");
    goto case "WARN";
  case "WARN":
    result.Add("WARN");
    goto case "ERROR";
  case "ERROR":
    result.Add("ERROR");
    goto case "FATAL";
  case "FATAL":
    result.Add("FATAL");
    goto case "OFF";
  case "OFF":
    result.Add("OFF");
    break;
  default:
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This... doesn't look right. I don't think this will achieve the proper result. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:14
    
Sorry copy paste mistake, answer edited –  Xharze Apr 21 '12 at 12:16
4  
@JeremyHolovacs: Believe it. Fall-through causes more bugs than it prevents. –  Eric Lippert Apr 21 '12 at 14:53
1  
@Jason: I think this is far off topic, but I dislike the government protecting me from myself as well; a language is meant to maximize utility by providing flexibility. To restrict something because it might screw you up is ridiculous; but if they were dead-set for it, an explicitly declared continue / yield keyword or something along those lines to enable potentially dangerous code would be appropriate. It would have been an elegant, easily readable solution to what I wanted to do, and it does work in many languages for expressly that reason. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 22 '12 at 20:30
1  
@Jeremy Holovacs: For example: "designing the language so as to prevent certain categories of subtle bugs is a huge priority for us." That is in direct opposition to your philosophy on languages. If you want to shoot yourself in the foot, use a different language. –  Jason Apr 22 '12 at 20:39

Use goto:

        switch (severity.ToUpper())
        {
            case "ALL":
                result.Add("ALL");
                goto case "DEBUG";
            case "DEBUG":
                result.Add("DEBUG");
                goto case "INFO";
            case "INFO":
                result.Add("INFO");
                goto case "WARN";
            case "WARN":
                result.Add("WARN");
                goto case "ERROR";
            case "ERROR":
                result.Add("ERROR");
                goto case "FATAL";
            case "FATAL":
                result.Add("FATAL");
                goto case "OFF";
            case "OFF":
                result.Add("OFF");
                break;
            default:
                break;
        }

Microsoft (implicitly) recommends this use: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/06tc147t(v=vs.71).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Yes this would work; it seems silly it would be necessary. And it may be aesthetics, but the idea of putting a goto clause in my code... not attractive. :) –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:21
    
I agree, I think an explicit fallthrough keyword would be ideal, but at least this is an option. –  Ian Newson Apr 21 '12 at 12:23

@nemesv's Linq answer is way better solution but if you want to do it with switch you could do like this and will get same result.

public static IEnumerable<string> SeverityOrHigher(string severity)
{
  var lastFound = -1;

  var severityList = new List<string>() { "ALL", "DEBUG", "INFO", "WARN", "ERROR", "FATAL", "OFF" };
  var results = new List<string>();

  foreach (var t in severityList)
  {

    if (lastFound > -1)
    {
      for (var index = lastFound + 1; index < severityList.Count; index++)
      {
        results.Add(severityList[index]);
      }
      return results;
    }

    switch (severity.ToUpper())
    {
      case "ALL":
        results.Add(severity);
        lastFound = 0;
        break;
      case "DEBUG":
        lastFound = 1;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
      case "INFO":
        lastFound = 2;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
      case "WARN":
        lastFound = 3;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
      case "ERROR":
        lastFound = 4;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
      case "FATAL":
        lastFound = 5;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
      case "OFF":
        lastFound = 6;
        results.Add(severity);
        break;
    }
  }

  return results;
}

Test:

  var list = SeverityOrHigher("ALL");
  foreach (var severity in list)
  {
    Console.WriteLine(severity);
  }

  Console.ReadKey();
share|improve this answer

Does not look very nice, but could do the job for you:

string s = severity.ToUpper();
result.add("OFF");
if (s == "OFF")
  return result;
result.add("FATAL");
if (s == "FATAL")
  return result;
result.add("ERROR");
if (s == "ERROR")
  return result;
// ...
result.add("ALL");
return result;
share|improve this answer
    
bleargh... yeah. This will work too, but I'm hoping that there's a C# construct for this that isn't so unwieldy. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:08

I'd go with somehting like creating another list which represents all valid severities and checking if the input severity is one of them:

public static IEnumerable<string> SeverityOrHigher(string severity)
{
    var result = new List<string>();
    var severities = new List<string> { "ALL", "DEBUG", "INFO", "WARN", "ERROR", "FATAL", "OFF" };

    severity = severity.ToUpper();

    if (severities.Contain(severity))
            result.Add(severity);

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this would accomplish what I am trying to do. –  Jeremy Holovacs Apr 21 '12 at 12:16

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