Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 1 data.frame named A, there are 5000 columns in it. How can I find columns in this data.frame that are equal to each other.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As @John mentioned, there are problems with using duplicated. I would add that transposing the data.frame forces all the data into a same data type before it is even compared with duplicated. On an example, here is a data.frame:

df <- data.frame( a = LETTERS[1:3],
                  b = 1:3,
                  c = as.character(1:3),
                  d = LETTERS[1:3],
                  e = 1:3,
                  f = 1:3)
df
#   a b c d e f
# 1 A 1 1 A 1 1
# 2 B 2 2 B 2 2
# 3 C 3 3 C 3 3

Note that column c is very similar to columns b, e, and f, but not identical because of the different types (character versus numeric). The solution suggested by @Jubbles would disregard these differences.

Instead, it seems more appropriate to use the identical function on the columns of your data.frame. You can compare columns two-by-two using outer:

are.cols.identical <- function(col1, col2) identical(df[,col1], df[,col2])
identical.mat      <- outer(colnames(df), colnames(df),
                            FUN = Vectorize(are.cols.identical))
identical.mat
# [,1]  [,2]  [,3]  [,4]  [,5]  [,6]
# [1,]  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
# [2,] FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
# [3,] FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE
# [4,]  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE
# [5,] FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
# [6,] FALSE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

From here, you can use clustering to identify groups of identical columns (there may be better ways so if you know one, feel free to comment or even edit my answer.)

library(cluster)
distances <- as.dist(!identical.mat)
tree      <- hclust(distances)
cut       <- cutree(tree, h = 0.5)
cut
# [1] 1 2 3 1 2 2

split(colnames(df), cut)
# $`1`
# [1] "a" "d"
# 
# $`2`
# [1] "b" "e" "f"
# 
# $`3`
# [1] "c"

Edit 1: to disregard differences in floating point values, one can use

are.cols.identical <- function(col1,col2) isTRUE(all.equal((df[,col1],df[,col2]))

Edit 2: a more efficient method than clustering for grouping the names of identical columns is

cut <- apply(identical.mat, 1, function(x)match(TRUE, x))
split(colnames(df), cut)
share|improve this answer
    
Upvote from me. Thanks for providing a more exhaustive answer than mine. –  Jubbles Apr 22 '12 at 1:53
    
I like the use of cluster here. There is room for even more potential answers here as this one doesn't address the issue of differences in floating point values that arise even though the values are fundamentally identical. –  John Apr 22 '12 at 2:32
    
An alternative way to extract information from identical.mat might be... which(identical.mat, arr.ind = TRUE) (only using the lower.tri() would make that better) –  John Apr 22 '12 at 2:35
    
Thank you @John. which is a good one if the user wants to show every pair of duplicated data. Also, differences in floating point can be addressed (i.e. ignored) if identical() above is replaced with isTRUE(all.equal()). –  flodel Apr 22 '12 at 11:26

This question is very similar to the one here, with subtle differences yet with the same caveats.

I would again suggest using digest(), as in the following (thanks to @flodel for the data.frame and for a very nice suggestion above)

df <- data.frame( a = LETTERS[1:3],
  b = 1:3,
  c = as.character(1:3),
  d = LETTERS[1:3],
  e = 1:3,
  f = 1:3)

dfDig <- sapply(df, digest)

ansL <- lapply(seq_along(dfDig), function(x) names(which(dfDig == dfDig[x])))

unique(ansL)

# [[1]]
# [1] "a" "d"

# [[2]]
# [1] "b" "e" "f"

# [[3]]
# [1] "c"

This still won't distinguish between 1.0 and 1, though.

EDIT

As suggested in the comments by @flodel, the following can be used alternatively after creating dfDig

split(colnames(df), vapply(dfDig, match, 1L, dfDig))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Nice, very concise. I did not know about digest, thank you for suggesting it. –  flodel Apr 22 '12 at 11:31
1  
Using match may be faster than which. This seems to work: split(colnames(df), vapply(dfDig, match, 1L, dfDig)) –  flodel Apr 22 '12 at 11:46
    
@flodel, that's a great suggestion. I'll add it above. –  BenBarnes Apr 22 '12 at 12:23

How about transposing the dataframe and using duplicated()?

B <- as.data.frame(t(A))
dup1 <- duplicated(B)
# if you want to identify all duplicated rows
dup2 <- duplicated(B, fromLast = TRUE)
dup_final <- dup1 * dup2
saved_colnames <- colnames(A)[dup_final]
share|improve this answer
    
I need to save columns' names... –  David Kakauridze Apr 21 '12 at 13:07
1  
@David Kakauridze: I think the last line I added should take care of that. –  Jubbles Apr 21 '12 at 13:09
1  
The duplicated() command will treat each value as text. Certain values may be considered equal in some situations but not be as text (or even in their natural form). For example, many values that are 0 will not be represented as such, (e.g. tan(pi)). Floating point numbers could be a serious problem here. It might be fine for the questioners situation but future readers should be warned that this is not a general solution. (and there isn't a general solution without a more complex function) –  John Apr 21 '12 at 14:09
    
@John: Thank you for the caveats. My proposed answer is admittedly "quick-and-dirty" and, as you pointed out, ripe for exceptional cases. –  Jubbles Apr 22 '12 at 1:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.