Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been comparing the raw CPU performance speed between the three main languages (code and results are below). I am very curious as to how the main languages compare for raw computational power. I had a theory that Java and C# could possibly rival C++ when there was no memory overhead involved.

My questions:

1) Edited (C++ timings now more realistic)

2) Am I right in thinking the JVM took ages on the first iteration, but for the second it had finished analysing and therefore optimised? How did Hotspot know to finish optimising after the first iteration of my outside loop and not halfway through?

3) Why does C# not perform like Java and heavily optimise at the start? What is different about C# with regards to Java? Why is the C# slower- is it simply due to less optimization?

4) Is there any specific reason why the oscillation between 2246 and 2262 milliseconds for the C# test timings, could this be two different times because the CPU has two cores?

EDIT: Updating code to show stopwatch usage in C# code.

EDIT: Correct C++ timing code and results

The setup:

  • C++: VS2010 and Intel Compiler (built in release mode, Optimization: O2, Enable intrinsic functions: yes, favor size nor speed: neither, omit frame pointers: No, enable fiber-safe optimizations: no, whole program optimization: yes)

  • Java: Eclipse, Hotspot 64 bit compiler version 17, Java 1.6

  • C#: VS2010 and .net 4.0 (built in release mode)

  • CPU: Intel E6600 (2.4GHz) running at 2.7GHz, bus speed 300MHz, 8GB memory, DRAM Freq: 375MHz

  • Win 7 (64 bit)

C++ code:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>
#include <mmsystem.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <fstream> 

using namespace std;


double PCFreq = 0.0;
__int64 CounterStart = 0;

void StartCounter()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    if(!QueryPerformanceFrequency(&li))
        cout << "QueryPerformanceFrequency failed!\n";

    PCFreq = li.QuadPart;

    QueryPerformanceCounter(&li);
    CounterStart = li.QuadPart;
}
double GetCounter()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER li;
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&li);
    return double(li.QuadPart-CounterStart)/PCFreq;
}

static long counter = 0;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

    for (int m = 0; m < 10; m++)
    {
        StartCounter();
        counter = 0;

        for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
        {
            //Just to test timing is working correctly
            //int* p = new int;

            for (long i = 0; i < 200000000; i++)
            {
                counter++;
            }
        }

        cout << GetCounter()*1000000 << " microseconds" << endl;
    }


    int p = 0;
    cin >> p;
    return 0;
}

C++ results:

7.19 microseconds

1.89

2.27

1.51

4.92

10.22

10.22

9.84

9.84

10.6

Java code:

public class main {

    static long counter = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        for(int m=0; m<10; m++){
            long start = System.nanoTime();
            counter = 0;

            for(int j=0;j<3; j++){
                for(long i=0; i<200000000; i++){
                    counter++;
                }
            }

            System.out.println(((System.nanoTime()-start)/1000000) + " ms");
        }
    }
}

Java results:

5703 milliseconds
471 ms
468 ms
467 ms
469 ms
467 ms
467 ms
467 ms
469 ms
464 ms

C# code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics

namespace t1
{
    class Program
    {
        static long counter = 0;

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            for (int m = 0; m < 10; m++)
            {
                Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
                s.Start();
                counter = 0;

                for (int j = 0; j < 3; j++)
                {

                    for (long i = 0; i < 200000000; i++)
                    {
                        counter++;
                    }

                }
                s.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine(s.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds + " ms");
            }

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}

C# results:

2277 milliseconds

2246 ms

2262 ms

2246 ms

2262 ms

2246 ms

2262 ms

2246 ms

2262 ms

2262 ms

share|improve this question
1  
For the C++ version, check the assembly output by your compiler. The loop could be optimized out entirely. –  Mat Apr 21 '12 at 14:56
1  
You don't need a great compiler to constant-fold that loop away, I could write a pass that does that (for primitive types). I suppose the only reason the JVM/CLR JIT doesn't do the same thing is some problem with your Java/C# benchmarks (does the JIT even kick in?). –  delnan Apr 21 '12 at 14:57
1  
For C# did you run in Visual Studio, or outside? Running with a debugger attached disables most optimizations. Just building in release mode is not enough. –  CodesInChaos Apr 21 '12 at 15:02
2  
@user1291492 I'm not sure what benchmarks you suggest instead. I agree that such microbenchmarks are useless for most application - however, that applies to all micro-benchmarks, multi-threaded or not. And in those cases where micro-benchmarks are useful, the application probably still does heavy listing on the individual cores, regardless of how many cores are used in parallel. Knowing how fast one can crunch numbers on one core still has some merit when you use N cores. Of course, in both cases you need to know how long you're actually calculating rather than waiting for I/O or a lock. –  delnan Apr 21 '12 at 15:02
1  
DateTime.Now is not useful for measuring time at that level. You're looking for Stopwatch. Also it doesn't look like you're using the QueryPerformanceCounter correctly. (stop-start)/freq = seconds. –  user7116 Apr 21 '12 at 15:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You've got a logical problem in your C++ code which uses QueryPerformanceFrequency:

PCFreq = double(li.QuadPart)/1000000000.0; // <- this is not correct
PCFreq = li.QuadPart;                      // <- this is correct

You should just assign li.QuadPart to PCFreq and do your conversion to milliseconds or nanoseconds in your printing code:

// convert from seconds to milliseconds
cout << GetCounter() * 1000.0 << endl;

With this change I get actual timings for your C++ code. Whether or not these timings are "valid" or useful in making comparisons, I will not comment.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks sixlettervariables. I got that timing code from an example online and I guess it was just spurious results that made it look correct. I have modified the code and it now takes between 1 and 10 microseconds. –  user997112 Apr 21 '12 at 15:26

1 - Sixlettervariables seems to have pointed out your mistake on this one

2 - The hotspot will optimize the code. Here is a similar question which also sees 10x speedups on loops. So what you see is expected output. First time a Java loop is run SLOW, why? [Sun HotSpot 1.5, sparc]

3 - I don't know enough about C# on this one to help. It's possible it doesn't optimize inner loops (you have 3 different loops). Maybe try extract the 2 loops you are testing into a completely separate method and see if that helps.

4 - DateTime is to represent a date and time, not high-precision timings. Hence it's not that accurate. DateTime.Now has a 10ms resolution as far as I'm aware

(FYI, this post has some good explanations on the JIT, C# and C++ optimizations which may help you: C++ performance vs. Java/C#)

share|improve this answer
    
No hotspot does indeed not optimize the code - which you can easily test because the performance is constant independent of the number of runs. Which I think has to do with 2 reasons: 1. we're using a non private static variable (that could be remedied) and 2. OSR will only JIT the increment loop and not the outer blocks. This means even if we defined the counter as a local variable it would still not remove the loop. –  Voo Apr 21 '12 at 19:26
    
@Voo, you've mentioned "OSR" a few times, what does this mean? –  user997112 Apr 21 '12 at 20:32
    
@user997112 Ups sorry, there I violated one of the basic principles again. OSR is On Stack Replacement. This article describes it simply for Java. Basically a JITed method is only used after we've finished compiling it, the next time when it is called. OSR instead compiles parts of code that is run by the compiler (eg a single loop) and we swap from interpreting to compiled code on the go. Has a couple of problems and is hardly ever useful in anything but micro benchmarks. –  Voo Apr 21 '12 at 21:05
    
Very interesting! Does the oracle website contain a great deal of these articles describe the inner workings?? –  user997112 Apr 21 '12 at 21:40

I think it may be possible, that the compiler will calculate the value of counter at compiletime and does not iterate through your loop.

I think a simple counter is a really bad benchmark.

By the way, try to run the java-code within a method. It may be faster because of the JIT-optimization. (But I am not sure)

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! First iteration now down to 5700 ms, second 8100ms and then the rest at ~670ms. Does that suggest there's a method overhead of about 200ms? I just re-ran and it's still averaging 670ms on the remaining iterations... –  user997112 Apr 21 '12 at 15:16
    
I think the Hotspot compiler needs some time to find code, which is worth to be compiled to mashine code. –  Christian Kuetbach Apr 21 '12 at 20:00
    
Are you suggesting that not all the code is compiled to machine code? If so, I do not understand... –  user997112 Apr 21 '12 at 22:40

Benchmarks for the various compilers has already been done and put together very nicely.

The Computer Language Benchmark Games

Java 7 Server vs. GNU C++

C# Mono vs. GNU C++

C# Mono vs Java 7 Server

While Java 7 Server is faster than C# Mono 2.10.8 look at the amount of memory that Java 7 utilizes.

share|improve this answer
    
Now everyone point at Perl and laugh. –  Andrew Finnell Apr 21 '12 at 15:47
    
It looks nice, but be wary of the specific details. If you look at the code in the examples many of the C# functions are sub-optimal, while the Java functions are heavily optomized. For example: here the tight loop in "MakeCumlative" Java gets dense arrays of floats (cpu cache optimal) shootout.alioth.debian.org/u64q/… while c# gets a bloated array of objects shootout.alioth.debian.org/u64q/… this is just one example, I'm sure it cuts both ways, but its pretty clear its not an apples to apples comparison –  Glenn Aug 3 '12 at 21:41
1  
@Glenn Also keep in mind the comparison is against Mono not .NET. I've "heard" that .NET 4.0 is extremely fast. Of course it would be against their EULA to prove this. –  Andrew Finnell Aug 4 '12 at 1:20
    
Yeah I was reading some articles that talked about all the compiler tricks the MS.net team use to avoid things like bounds checking.. it sounded like a lot of work and like something I would expect mono to lag a bit on.. although mono did introduce true 64bit array support first so maybe in common primitive cases mono is more competitive. –  Glenn Aug 4 '12 at 21:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.