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I have created a socket and I am trying to accept the connection. Everything works fine. But, the output is confusing me about how the following code works.

      // this a server program
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <assert.h>
    #include <string.h>
    #include <sys/stat.h>
    #include <unistd.h>
    #include <sys/socket.h>
    #include <sys/types.h>
    #include <sys/un.h>
    #include <arpa/inet.h>
    #include <errno.h>
    #include <wait.h>

    #define LISTENQ (1024)

    int main(void) {

       int lstn_sock, conn_sock;
       struct sockaddr_in my_serv;
       short int pnum = 4080;

       // create listening socket
       if( (lstn_sock = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) < 0) {
        printf("Error (socket): %s\n",strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
       }

       // initialize socket address
       memset( &my_serv, 0, sizeof(my_serv) );
       my_serv.sin_family = AF_INET;
       my_serv.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
       my_serv.sin_port = htons(pnum);

       // associate address with socket. 
       if( bind(lstn_sock, (struct sockaddr *) &my_serv, sizeof(my_serv)) < 0){
        printf("Error (bind): %s\n",strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
       }
        //printf("lstn_sock: %d\n",lstn_sock);
       // start listening to socket
       if( listen(lstn_sock, LISTENQ) < 0){
        printf("Error (listen): %s\n",strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
       }

       // make it a daemon
       while(1){
        // retrieve connect request and connect
        if( (conn_sock = accept(lstn_sock, NULL, NULL)) < 0){
           printf("Error (accept): %s\n",strerror(errno));
           exit(1);
        }

        printf("The server says hi!\n");

        // close connected socket
        if( close(conn_sock) < 0){
           printf("Error (close): %s\n",strerror(errno));
           exit(1);
        }
       }

    return 0;

    }

@ubuntu:$ ./my_code & @ubuntu:$ telnet localhost 4080

Following are the 2 different output from the above code:
Output1
Trying ::1...
Trying 127.0.0.1..
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
The server says hi!
Connection closed by foreign host.

Output2
Trying ::1...
Trying 127.0.0.1..
The server says hi!
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
Connection closed by foreign host.

Could someone please explain the reason for the movement of "The server says hi!"
in the output.

share|improve this question
    
We can't see where the other output is printed? –  James McLaughlin Apr 21 '12 at 15:07
    
@JamesMcLaughlin : thanks for the reply. Output1 & Output2 are from 2 different runs of the same code. –  jdek Apr 21 '12 at 15:10
    
I mean, you only included the code where "The server says hi" is printed. I can't explain why the output is in that order without seeing the rest of the code. –  James McLaughlin Apr 21 '12 at 15:11
    
added the complete code. –  jdek Apr 21 '12 at 15:26
1  
@jdek; write(conn_sock, "The ... –  Morpfh Apr 21 '12 at 15:38

2 Answers 2

I'm guessing you started your server in the background, and are using telnet, in the same terminal, to test it.

Your server prints that greeting to standard output, telnet also writes to standard output. They are two independent processes that will get scheduled independently (possibly concurrently). You can't predict the exact order in which the output will appear on your terminal.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you Mat, your guess is correct. Is there no way to control the output? can I somehow assign the telnet process to a thread and control the output order? –  jdek Apr 21 '12 at 15:29
    
Not really, and there's no point. Start your telnet session in another terminal if you don't want overlap, or write your own client/use netcat, ... Are you sure you're not trying to write that message to the socket rather than stdout or something? –  Mat Apr 21 '12 at 15:36
    
You are right. I will follow your advice. I am learning about sockets. I think I am writing to stdout. I changed my printf call to "fprintf(stdout,"The...hi!..);". It still gives me the same error. Thank you for all the knowledge. –  jdek Apr 21 '12 at 15:45
    
To repeat: you cannot synchronize the output to stdout of these two independent processes. printf(...) and fprintf(stdout,...) are synonymous, they do exactly the same thing. If you want the stuff printed on your screen in the same order, write to the socket in your server code, not to stdout. –  Mat Apr 21 '12 at 15:48
    
Now, I understand what you were trying to say. As @Rune has pointed out. I should use write() using conenction. This way the server prints the greeting and it is in order. –  jdek Apr 21 '12 at 15:59

I wrote a longer answer but then had kernel panic!!!! So intensely hate my MOBO. But here is a shorter re-cap.

I see your issue is solved but only to be clear:

You could read - and subs.

You are using a terminal. A terminal normally has three streams:

  • stdin
  • stdout
  • stderr

When you start your server program a process is started in that terminal.

The process inherits various "things" from the terminal process like environment variables, limits, etc. The server also becomes a child process of the shell. The shell itself is typically a child of a higher process, and so on.

When you use the ampersand the process is put into the background, but still child of same terminal.

Writes to either stream is written to same stream as shell that started the process.

In a typically server / client scenario you would not write to the stdout to send a message. The stdout of the server is bound to the server environment (/proc/[pid]/fd/…). The client, usually on a different system, has (typically) no access to anything on the server - thus the entire concept of sockets - communication between independent systems. That is why you write to the connection instead.


A quick look at your case using various Linux tools;

If you issue pstree you could easily visualize this; something like (lots removed):

$ ./server 4082 &
[1] 2795 <-- PID OF SERVER
$ pstree -p
init(1)─┬─ ...
        :
        ├─gnome-terminal(2369)─┬─bash(2374)───mplayer(2459)───mplayer(2460)
        │                      ├─bash(2586)───pstree(2779)
        │                      ├─bash(2646)
        │                      ├─bash(2705)───server(2795) <-- YOUR SERVER
        │                      ├─gnome-pty-helpe(2373)
        │                      ├─{gnome-terminal}(2371)
        │                      ├─{gnome-terminal}(2372)
        │                      └─{gnome-terminal}(2375)
        :
$ telnet localhost 4082  <--- IN SAME TERMINAL
$ pstree -p
init(1)─┬─ ...
        :
        ├─gnome-terminal(2369)─┬─bash(2374)───mplayer(2459)───mplayer(2460)
        │                      ├─bash(2586)───pstree(2779)
        │                      ├─bash(2646)
        │                      ├─bash(2705)─┬─server(2795) <-- YOUR SERVER
        │                      │            └─telnet(2797) <-- TELNET SAME SHELL
        │                      ├─gnome-pty-helpe(2373)
        │                      ├─{gnome-terminal}(2371)
        │                      ├─{gnome-terminal}(2372)
        │                      └─{gnome-terminal}(2375)
        :

Now. Server and shell share same bash and consequentially same end user output - stdout

You can spy on the different streams of a process in various ways. One easy way is to use strace:

$ sudo strace -ewrite -p 12345

where 12345 is the PID of the process. I.e.;

$ sudo strace -e write=0,1,3,4 -p 2797
Process 2797 attached - interrupt to quit
select(4, [0 3], [], [3], NULL)         = 1 (in [0])
read(0, "frack!\n", 8129)               = 7
select(4, [0 3], [3], [3], {0, 0})      = 1 (out [3], left {0, 0})
send(3, "frack!\r\n", 8, 0)             = 8
 | 00000  66 72 61 63 6b 21 0d 0a                           frack!..          |
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for going the extra mile Rune. This graphic has definetly etched this concept in my mind. –  jdek Apr 22 '12 at 16:08
    
@jdek; Np. By the way; I see I pasted wrong line in [1] 2795 <-- PID OF SERVER (PID mismatch from rest of paste). Corrected. Sorry about that. –  Morpfh Apr 22 '12 at 16:15

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