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This simple example demonstrates the C++ syntax for calling base class constructors - as far as I understand it as a C++ learner:

class BaseClass {
protected:
  int i;
public:
  BaseClass(int x) { 
     i = x; 
  }
};

class DerivedClass: public BaseClass {
  int j;
public:
  DerivedClass(int x, int y): BaseClass(y) { 
     j = x; 
  }

Here, the base class constructor can take named arguments to the derived class constructor as input.

Now, what if I want to call BaseClass() constructor with an input value that is not a direct input to DerivedClass()? Basically, I'd like to do some multiline work with x and y within DerivedClass(), then pass a calculated value to BaseClass(). Can this be done with constructors? Should this be done with some kind of initializer method instead?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You can do that, yes:

class BaseClass
{
  public:
    BaseClass(int x) : i(x) {}

  private:
    int i;
};

class DerivedClass: public BaseClass
{
  public:
    DerivedClass(int x, int y):
      BaseClass(compute(x, y)), // Neither i or j are initialized here yet
      j(x)
      {}

  private:
    static int compute(int a, int b) { return a + b; } // Or whatever
    int j;
};

Note that you can even make compute() a non-static method but be aware that DerivedClass or BaseClass members won't be initialized at the time of the call. So you won't be able to rely on their values.

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@Seth Carnegie: Thanks for the missing ; fix :D I guess I've been doing too much Python lately. –  ereOn Apr 21 '12 at 16:33

Then you can do this:

DerivedClass(int x, int y): BaseClass(compute(x,y)), j(y) { 
     //j = x;  //use member-initialization-list ---> ^^^^
  }

int compute(int x, int y) 
{
     //your code
}
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If you're using C++11 or newer you can also use lambda expressions:

class BaseClass
{
  public:
    BaseClass(int x) : i(x) {}

  private:
    int i;
};

class DerivedClass: public BaseClass
{
  public:
      DerivedClass(int x, int y): BaseClass(
          [=]()->int
            {
                int sum = 0;
                for(int i = 0; i < x; ++i)
                {
                    sum += y + i * x;
                }
                return sum;
            }()), j(x)
      {}

  private:
    int j;
};
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1  
+1 for the reminder that there exists lambda. But it will not be good if the computation is too big. It makes difficult to read the constructor (IMHO). –  Nawaz Apr 21 '12 at 16:29

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