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For a Firefox extension, I'm trying to do the following:

  1. Setup an object with two methods and a field/property/attribute
  2. One of the methods has to be able to call the other method and access the attribute
  3. I want to register that method as an event listener.

Right now, I have it setup like a class:

var Obj = {
  field: null,
  a: function() { }
  b: function() {
    Obj.field = 'x';
    Obj.a();
  }
}

window.addEventListener('mouseup', Obj.b, false);

But it seems like it should be possible to have the mod not refer to the object "from the outside" (e.g. by using Obj), but using just this instead. However, I can't figure out how to get this to work correctly, pass a simple function reference to addEventListener() and (preferably) only polluting the namespace with a single name. Is that possible? I tried googling for it and found e.g. http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-class-instantiation/, but that didn't seem to lead to something that fits my criteria of a clean setup.

share|improve this question
    
The value of this in JavaScript is very dynamic. It is a calling context, meaning it is generally set when the function is called, and differs based on how it was called. You should probably read a tutorial on the various ways that this is set. Some are implicit, some are explicit. – squint Apr 21 '12 at 17:08
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the ES5 bind function:

var Obj = {
  field: null,
  a: function() { }
  b: function() {
    this.a = 'x';
    this.a();   //Note: not sure what you're trying to do, but calling a string like a function won't work.
  }
}

window.addEventListener('mouseup', Obj.b.bind(Obj), false);
share|improve this answer

bind is definitely a good approach. However, notice that addEventListener method can accept object that implements the EventListener interface, instead of a function:

var Obj = {
  field: null,
  a: function() { },
  b: function() {
    this.field = 'x'; // if you overrides `a` you can't call it
    this.a();
  },

  handleEvent: function(event) {
    switch(event.type) {
      case "mouseup":
         this.b();
         break;
    }
  }
}

window.addEventListener('mouseup', Obj, false);

This can be useful if you have multiple events related to Obj, and/or if you have multiple instances of the same object (not your case).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for learning something new. – Dennis Apr 21 '12 at 17:08
    
Perfect solution for the problem, thanks! – djc Apr 21 '12 at 17:10

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