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I'm trying to write a function in python, which will determine what type of value is in string; for example

if in string is 1 or 0 or True or False the value is BIT

if in string is 0-9*, the value is INT

if in string is 0-9+.0-9+ the value is float

if in string is stg more (text, etc) value is text

so far i have stg like

def dataType(string):

 odp=''
 patternBIT=re.compile('[01]')
 patternINT=re.compile('[0-9]+')
 patternFLOAT=re.compile('[0-9]+\.[0-9]+')
 patternTEXT=re.compile('[a-zA-Z0-9]+')
 if patternTEXT.match(string):
     odp= "text"
 if patternFLOAT.match(string):
     odp= "FLOAT"
 if patternINT.match(string):
     odp= "INT"
 if patternBIT.match(string):
     odp= "BIT"

 return odp 

But i'm not very skilled in using regexes in python..could you please tell, what am i doing wrong? For example it doesn't work for 2010-00-10 which should be Text, but is INT or 20.90, which should be float but is int

share|improve this question
1  
What do your inputs look like? Remember that match only matches at the start of a string. –  jamylak Apr 21 '12 at 17:07
    
When does your code not work? –  San4ez Apr 21 '12 at 17:08
    
edit: nevermind –  ch3ka Apr 21 '12 at 17:09
1  
Please post a sample of the file you are trying to parse, so we can reproduce the error and check our solution work as intended. –  mac Apr 21 '12 at 17:09
2  
You don't need to use regular expressions - you can attempt to convert/cast the string to a different type with int(), float(). For bit, you can check if the string length is 1 and is in (0, 1). And then wrap the conversions with try-except. But that is unrelated to your regex. –  birryree Apr 21 '12 at 17:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Before you go too far down the regex route, have you considered using ast.literal_eval

Examples:

In [35]: ast.literal_eval('1')
Out[35]: 1

In [36]: type(ast.literal_eval('1'))
Out[36]: int

In [38]: type(ast.literal_eval('1.0'))
Out[38]: float

In [40]: type(ast.literal_eval('[1,2,3]'))
Out[40]: list

May as well use Python to parse it for you!

OK, here is a bigger example:

import ast, re
def dataType(str):
    str=str.strip()
    if len(str) == 0: return 'BLANK'
    try:
        t=ast.literal_eval(str)

    except ValueError:
        return 'TEXT'
    except SyntaxError:
        return 'TEXT'

    else:
        if type(t) in [int, long, float, bool]:
            if t in set((True,False)):
                return 'BIT'
            if type(t) is int or type(t) is long:
                return 'INT'
            if type(t) is float:
                return 'FLOAT'
        else:
            return 'TEXT' 



testSet=['   1  ', ' 0 ', 'True', 'False',   #should all be BIT
         '12', '34l', '-3','03',              #should all be INT
         '1.2', '-20.4', '1e66', '35.','-   .2','-.2e6',      #should all be FLOAT
         '10-1', 'def', '10,2', '[1,2]','35.9.6','35..','.']

for t in testSet:
    print "{:10}:{}".format(t,dataType(t))

Output:

   1      :BIT
 0        :BIT
True      :BIT
False     :BIT
12        :INT
34l       :INT
-3        :INT
03        :INT
1.2       :FLOAT
-20.4     :FLOAT
1e66      :FLOAT
35.       :FLOAT
-   .2    :FLOAT
-.2e6     :FLOAT
10-1      :TEXT
def       :TEXT
10,2      :TEXT
[1,2]     :TEXT
35.9.6    :TEXT
35..      :TEXT
.         :TEXT

And if you positively MUST have a regex solution, which produces the same results, here it is:

def regDataType(str):
    str=str.strip()
    if len(str) == 0: return 'BLANK'

    if re.match(r'True$|^False$|^0$|^1$', str):
        return 'BIT'
    if re.match(r'([-+]\s*)?\d+[lL]?$', str): 
        return 'INT'
    if re.match(r'([-+]\s*)?[1-9][0-9]*\.?[0-9]*([Ee][+-]?[0-9]+)?$', str): 
        return 'FLOAT'
    if re.match(r'([-+]\s*)?[0-9]*\.?[0-9][0-9]*([Ee][+-]?[0-9]+)?$', str): 
        return 'FLOAT'

    return 'TEXT' 

I cannot recommend the regex over the ast version however; just let Python do the interpretation of what it thinks these data types are rather than interpret them with a regex...

share|improve this answer
    
+1 that is very nice –  birryree Apr 21 '12 at 17:19
    
thanks for the answer, but I cant figure out, how to use ast to determine the "BIT" and "TEXT" value (especially for TEXT - it gives me an error, when i call ast.literal('string') –  Johnzzz Apr 21 '12 at 17:33
    
@Johnzzz, try ast.literal('"string"'). The outermost quotes create a string, but it won't be parsed as a string by ast.literal unless it also has quote marks around it. –  senderle Apr 21 '12 at 17:44
1  
@Johnzzz, and then testing for "BIT" is easy; just check if the value is in set((True, False)). (0 and 1 pass this test as well as True and False, at least in Python 2.6. It might be different in newer versions.) –  senderle Apr 21 '12 at 17:46
1  
With re.match you do not need the initial ^ anchor. This method already searches from the beginning of the string. You would need the anchor with re.search Read re.search vs re.match +1 anyways. –  dawg Apr 22 '12 at 15:46

You could also use json.

import json
converted_val = json.loads('32.45')
type(converted_val)

Outputs

type <'float'>

EDIT

To answer your question, however:

re.match() returns partial matches, starting from the beginning of the string. Since you keep evaluating every pattern match the sequence for "2010-00-10" goes like this:

if patternTEXT.match(str_obj): #don't use 'string' as a variable name.

it matches, so odp is set to "text"

then, your script does:

if patternFLOAT.match(str_obj):

no match, odp still equals "text"

if patternINT.match(str_obj):

partial match odp is set to "INT"

Because match returns partial matches, multiple if statements are evaluated and the last one evaluated determines which string is returned in odp.

You can do one of several things:

  1. rearrange the order of your if statements so that the last one to match is the correct one.

  2. use if and elif for the rest of your if statements so that only the first statement to match is evaluated.

  3. check to make sure the match object is matching the entire string:

    ...
    match = patternINT.match(str_obj)
    if match:
        if match.end() == match.endpos:
            #do stuff
    ...
    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- yup, that works too –  the wolf Apr 21 '12 at 17:18
    
But type(json.loads('1')) returns int while OP wants bool –  San4ez Apr 21 '12 at 17:20
    
@San4ez: you're right. that would be a special case. as would "bit". –  Joel Cornett Apr 21 '12 at 17:28
    
@JoelCornett json module wasn't obvious there +1 –  San4ez Apr 21 '12 at 17:30
    
@San4ez: Thanks :) Also, I realized my answer didn't actually answer the OP's question "What am I doing wrong?". Edited to include that. –  Joel Cornett Apr 21 '12 at 17:47

You said that you used these for input:

  • 2010-00-10 (was int, not text)
  • 20.90 (was int, not float)

Your original code:

def dataType(string):

 odp=''
 patternBIT=re.compile('[01]')
 patternINT=re.compile('[0-9]+')
 patternFLOAT=re.compile('[0-9]+\.[0-9]+')
 patternTEXT=re.compile('[a-zA-Z0-9]+')
 if patternTEXT.match(string):
     odp= "text"
 if patternFLOAT.match(string):
     odp= "FLOAT"
 if patternINT.match(string):
     odp= "INT"
 if patternBIT.match(string):
     odp= "BIT"

 return odp 

The Problem

Your if statements would be sequentially executed - that is:

if patternTEXT.match(string):
    odp= "text"
if patternFLOAT.match(string):
    odp= "FLOAT"
if patternINT.match(string)
    odp= "INT"
if patternBIT.match(string):
    odp= "BIT"

"2010-00-10" matches your text pattern, but then it will then try to match against your float pattern (fails because there's not .), then matches against the int pattern, which works because it does contain [0-9]+.

You should use:

if patternTEXT.match(string):
    odp = "text"
elif patternFLOAT.match(string):
    ...

Though for your situation, you probably want to go more specific to less specific, because as you've seen, stuff that is text might also be int (and vice versa). You would need to improve your regular expressions too, as your 'text' pattern only matches for alphanumeric input, but doesn't match against special symbols.

I will offer my own suggestion, though I do like the AST solution more:

def get_type(string):

    if len(string) == 1 and string in ['0', '1']:
        return "BIT"

    # int has to come before float, because integers can be
    # floats.
    try:
        long(string)
        return "INT"
    except ValueError, ve:
        pass

    try:
        float(string)
        return "FLOAT"
    except ValueError, ve:
        pass

    return "TEXT"

Run example:

In [27]: get_type("034")
Out[27]: 'INT'

In [28]: get_type("3-4")
Out[28]: 'TEXT'


In [29]: get_type("20.90")
Out[29]: 'FLOAT'

In [30]: get_type("u09pweur909ru20")
Out[30]: 'TEXT'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 yup, that works –  the wolf Apr 21 '12 at 18:08

In reply to

For example it doesn't work for 2010-00-10 which should be Text, but is INT or 20.90, which should be float but is int

>>> import re
>>> patternINT=re.compile('[0-9]+')
>>> print patternINT.match('2010-00-10')
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x7fa17bc69850>
>>> patternINT=re.compile('[0-9]+$')
>>> print patternINT.match('2010-00-10')
None
>>> print patternINT.match('2010')
<_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x7fa17bc69850>

Don't forget $ to limit ending of string.

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