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I never did kernel programming. I am a good programmer in the Java language and frequently use it. Now i feel to do something interesting with kernels. A kernel resides between hardware and OS. It communicates with hardware using system calls. Every programming language require a compiler to compile the code written in high level language and then it generate low level code, which is generally assembly language code. Here comes my doubt, if we have kernel written in C, then should we have a C compiler installed on the machine? At the end, when kernel interacts with hardware it uses assembly language, can i create kernel in Java language? If yes, then what are the requirements for the same? Thank you.

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I don't understand the question. Why are you marking stuff as code that's not code? –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 17:58
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I think you are confusing assembly language with machine instructions. –  Dagg Nabbit Apr 21 '12 at 17:59
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This is off topic here. Theoretical Computer Science, perhaps? Probably OT there, too –  Sean Patrick Floyd Apr 21 '12 at 18:03
    
@Sean: What? That has nothing to do with theoretical computer science. I think of all the StackExchange sites, this one is the most fitting (although the question is so bad that it wouldn't be a good fit for any of them). –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 18:06
    
@GGG: Yeah. Niklas posted the answer. I was talking about machine instruction but i was confused! –  Ravi Joshi Apr 21 '12 at 18:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A kernel resides between hardware and OS

No, the kernel is part of the operating system.

It communicates with hardware using system calls

No, system calls are the interface that is provided by the OS to user applications. The operating system communicates with the hardware through other mechanisms (for example interrupts or memory-mapped registers).

Every programming language require a compiler to compile the code written in high level language and then it generate low level code, which is generally assembly language code.

No, the output is typically either native machine code or a language-specific bytecode (like in the case of Java).

Here comes my doubt, if we have kernel written in C, then should we have a C compiler installed on the machine?

No, that's not necessary. The C compiler produces output that can execute directly on the hardware without interpretation.

At the end, when kernel interacts with hardware it uses assembly language

No, the CPU doesn't understand assembly. It understands machine code.

can i create kernel in Java language?

I don't know if you can, but other people can.

If yes, then what are the requirements for the same?

If you want to write the whole thing in Java, then obviously you either have to

  • compile your entire Java codebase to machine code
  • get yourself a CPU that can execute Java bytecode
  • find or build a Java VM and runtime that can run on bare metal and run your Java code in it (if you do it cleverly, you can write much of the runtime and maybe also parts of the VM in Java itself).

Now to the unspoken, almost rhethorical question:

Is this a good idea?

Probably not. Why? First of all, because it would take ages to set up. Second, because you couldn't just code the way you develop an average business application. You'd have to think about performance of very time-critical code (e.g. context switching, which often requires hand-tuned assembly to be fast enough), manual memory management (as in: your MRU might expect you to give it the physical address where the page table lies), system-/hardware-specific mechanisms (how to access a XYZ controller on this particular architecture?), ...

So you'd basically lose many of the advantages that Java has over a low-level language like C in the first place.

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No, you just really need the runtime to execute on the bare metal, you don't necessarily need the majority of the kernel logic to be in machine code. Obviously, it's a layer of indirection compared to running flat out on the CPU it self, but when the runtime includes a JIT, that effectively goes away in time. –  Will Hartung Apr 21 '12 at 18:06
    
@Will: That's actually what I had in mind too. Lemme edit to reflect this. –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 18:07
    
@NiklasB. get yourself a CPU that can execute Java bytecode What does it mean? Do you mean that machine must have JRE installed? Right now i have Intel Core 2 Duo t5670 @ 1.80GHz –  Ravi Joshi Apr 21 '12 at 18:22
    
@Ravi: No, I mean hardware that can execute Java. Your JRE just uses the operating system's APIs (which obviously isn't available if you code your own OS). –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 18:25
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@Ravi: Of course not. Intel understands x86 machine code with extensions. –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 18:29

Yes a kernel can be written in Java, see the JNode. It would have the advantage of having no problems with: dangling pointers, mix up of pointers and array addresses, unitialised data, and many more features of C.

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And what about the hardware requirements? –  Ravi Joshi Apr 21 '12 at 18:27
    
@Ravi: JNode takes the approach of compiling the operating system code to machine code, so it doesn't have any special hardware requirements. –  Niklas B. Apr 21 '12 at 18:32
    
Okay.. thank you. –  Ravi Joshi Apr 21 '12 at 18:34

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