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All,

Is there a way around the "instance needs to have a primary key value before a many-to-many relationship can be used" error?

I have a model with several fields including a many-to-many relationship to another model. I have a function to set default values on those fields when I am creating a new instance of the model. I do this in the view when handling an HTTP GET. The m2m field gets rendered using a formset.

Here is some pseudo-code describing the situation:

class MyRelatedModel(models.Model):
  name = models.CharField(max_length=100,blank=True)

class MyModel(models.Model):
  name = models.CharField(max_length=100,blank=True)
  relatedModels = models.ManyToManyField("MyRelatedModel")

  def initialize(self):
    self.name = "my default name"
    # this bit doesn't really matter...
    # just assume I am creating a new set of RelatedModels that I want to associate with my this new MyModel...
    newRelatedModels = []
    for name in ["related model 1", "related model 2", "related model 3"]:
      relatedModel = MyRelatedModel(name=name)
      relatedModel.save()
      newRelatedModels.append(relatedModel.id)
    self.relatedModels = newRelatedModels # this is invalid!

def MyView(request):
  if request.method == 'GET':
    model = MyModel()
    model.initialize()
    form = MyForm(instance=model)
  return render_to_response("my_template.html", {"form" : form}, context_instance=RequestContext(request))

Any suggestions?

I suspect that I may need to handle this on the form side rather than the model side, but that's confusing me too.

share|improve this question
    
You need to save model before raleted it with other models. Something like self.save() –  danihp Apr 21 '12 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For the Form what is working for me in 1.3.1:

is something similar to this, the manytomany in the inital

with hardcode ids:

def MyView(request):
    if request.method == 'GET':
        model   = MyModel( name = "my default name")
        initial = { 'relatedModels': [1,] } # assuming you knew the id and wanted to hardcode it
        form = MyForm( instance=model, initial=initial )
        return render_to_response("my_template.html", {"form" : form}, context_instance=RequestContext(request))

using a query to populate by names:

def MyView(request):
    if request.method == 'GET':
        model   = MyModel( name = "my default name")
        initial = { 'relatedModels':  [ o.pk for o in list(MyRelatedModel.objects.filter( name__in=("related model 1", "related model 2", "related model 3")))], } 
        form = MyForm( instance=model, initial=initial )
        return render_to_response("my_template.html", {"form" : form}, context_instance=RequestContext(request))
share|improve this answer
for name in ["related model 1", "related model 2", "related model 3"]:
    relatedModel = MyRelatedModel(name=name)
    relatedModel.save()
    self.relatedModels.add(relatedModel)

Or:

newRelatedModels = []
for name in ["related model 1", "related model 2", "related model 3"]:
    relatedModel = MyRelatedModel(name=name)
    relatedModel.save()
    newRelatedModels.append(relatedModel)
self.relatedModels.add(*newRelatedModels)

This should work too:

self.relatedModels = newRelatedModels
share|improve this answer
    
I think the problem is that self don't has value for pk until self is saved. This means that problem don't comes from related mode save, appears when self assign model to it self before take a pk. –  danihp Apr 21 '12 at 18:34
    
Sure, you should have saved model object before calling initialize –  San4ez Apr 21 '12 at 18:40

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