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As an example, with this script;

mysql_query("LOCK TABLES mytest WRITE;");

for ($i = 1; $i < 100000; ++$i) {
    mysql_query("INSERT INTO mytest (Value, Value2, Value3) VALUES ($i, $i, $i);");
}

mysql_query("UNLOCK TABLES;");

What would happen if the script timed out / the users computer crashed / whatever before the UNLOCK TABLES stage is reached? Will mysql "notice" the client requesting the lock has disconnected and release the lock appropriately, or will it be stuck infinitively?

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The first question that comes to mind is does your sql engine support locking, first of all? .. and "infinitively"? –  Blake Apr 21 '12 at 19:05
1  
You might want to use ignore_user_abort(true); to ensure your script finishes no matter if the user aborts the request or disconnects for another reason. –  ThiefMaster Apr 21 '12 at 19:08
    
@Blake What's wrong with infinitively? And yes it supports locking. –  natli Apr 21 '12 at 19:08
    
@ThiefMaster Apparently that's not necessary, but thanks for the tip! –  natli Apr 21 '12 at 19:11
    
@natli "In grammar, infinitive is the name for certain verb forms that exist in many languages..." You wanted "infinitely." Just because a word exists, doesn't mean it's used properly. –  Blake Apr 21 '12 at 19:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

According to the MySQL docs:

If the connection for a client session terminates, whether normally or abnormally, the server implicitly releases all table locks held by the session (transactional and nontransactional). If the client reconnects, the locks will no longer be in effect.

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+1 Who knew it took 11.7k rep to learn how to google "mysql table lock" and read –  PhpMyCoder Apr 21 '12 at 19:09
    
@PhpMyCoder Awesome sarcasm, and I did google, but for a more specific phrase. –  natli Apr 21 '12 at 19:09
    
Actually it was "mysql lock tables". :) –  John Conde Apr 21 '12 at 19:09
1  
dba.stackexchange.com/questions/2763/… has some good information as well –  Blake Apr 21 '12 at 19:10

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