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I want to create a class that can take different types of value in a property. I am trying to do this using polymorphism, but I am not still learning how to do this properly, hence my request for advice.

I have a base class and two classes that inherit from it:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Unit Unit { get; set; }
}

public class DerivedClassFloat : BaseClass
{
    public float Value { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}

public class DerivedClassString : BaseClass
{
    public string Value { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value;
    }
}

All is good, I can create a List and add different specialized subclasses. My problem comes when I need change the values of the items in my list:

foreach (var item in ListOfBaseClasses)
{
   if(item is DerivedClassFloat)
     ((DerivedClassFloat) item).Value = float.NaN;
   if (item is DerivedClassString)
      ((DerivedClassString) item).Value = string.Empty;
}

According to what I have read, that looks like a code smell. Is there a better way to access the value property of my derived classes based on the type I am trying to assign?

What about when you want to create the right subclass based on the value?

BaseClass newClass = null;
if (phenotype is DerivedClassFloat)
    newClass = new DerivedClassFloat(){Value = 12.2};
if (phenotype is DerivedClassString)
    newClass = new DerivedClassString(){Value = "Hello"};                      

I read about overriding virtual methods, but that works if I want to process the value, not to add or change it … maybe I am missing something?


I should make this more concrete, my apologies, I am not used to post question in this great site.

I need a property that is made of a list of attributes. Each attribute has a name and a value, but the value can be of different types. For example:

public class Organism
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Attribute> Attributes { get; set; }
}

public class Attribute
{
    public string AttributeName { get; set; }
    public object AttributeValue { get; set; }
}

For a given organism I can have several attributes holding different value types. I wanted to avoid using the object type so that I don’t have to cast to the right type. I though property polymorphism was the solution to handle this case elegantly, but then I found myself using If ..Then which didn’t seem too different from casting in the first place.

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Is setting to float.NaN and string.Empty the only case when you need this? Or are there other cases too? –  svick Apr 21 '12 at 19:37
    
Can you give a practical example of how you whant to use this design pattern, because this general question is not very clear. –  david.s Apr 21 '12 at 20:06
    
I added a more concrete example, explainin exactly what I intend, I hope this helps explain myself better –  Luciano Apr 21 '12 at 20:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If in your particular case you want to reset Value, you can define an abstract ResetValue method in the base class, which will be implemented by the derives classes.

As for your second case, you should check out Creational Design Patterns, and specifically the Factory and Prototype design patterns.

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The RestValue suggestion is spot-on for initializing or reinitialize the values. –  Luciano Apr 21 '12 at 21:05
    
The factory pattern seems nice to instantiate the right subclass, but what about when I need to set the value? E.g. (using my first example): /* depending on value type I get either DerivedClassFloat or DerivedClassString*/ BaseClass newClass = new SubClassFactory(ValueType); /*Set value*/ if(newClass is DerivedClassFloat) ((DerivedClassFloat) item).Value = 12.22; if (newClass is DerivedClassString) ((DerivedClassString) item).Value = “hello”; Is there a pattern to avoid the If...Then? or is it something I need to live with? –  Luciano Apr 21 '12 at 21:12

You can use Generics for this particular case:

public abstract class BaseClass<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Unit Unit { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

public class DerivedClassFloat : BaseClass<float>
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}

public class DerivedClassString : BaseClass<string>
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If I use generics as you sugest (which is a very cool way of modeling my case BTW) how can I define a collection that will hold both DerivedClassFloat and DerivedClassString classes? –  Luciano Apr 21 '12 at 21:21

You can use generics to define the type and the implementing subclass will set the Value type to the type constraint:

public abstract class BaseClass<T>
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public Unit Unit { get; set; }
    public T Value { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}

public class DerivedFloat : BaseClass<float> {}

public class DerivedString : BaseClass<string> {}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure how this addresses the problem. How will he then iterate through the instances and set their values? –  Adi Lester Apr 21 '12 at 19:46
    
I missed the statement about iterating a collection of base classes. This will not work in that case. –  Metro Smurf Apr 21 '12 at 19:52

Polymorphic behaviour works on abstraction. Based on what your trying to do, you can reduce code smell to moving as much of your variability in code to base classess.

i would suggest is instead of property write method like as follows. You can something like as follows.

public void setValue(string val, Type type);//move this to your base class

    Class MyValue{
private string strVal;
private int intVal;

//constructor
MyValue(string val, Type type){
     //check the type enum here and set the values accordingly
}
}

then when set values
foreach (var item in ListOfBaseClasses)
{
     item.setValue = MyValue("",Type.INT);
}
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I'm not quite sure what you are trying to achieve with this approach - the Value properties are not of the same type, there is also no Value property on the base class which suggests that other types derived from the base class might not have it at all.

If all of your classes require a Value property, then maybe it should be of the most general type object - you could put it onto the base class, but that would require casting the values in the derived classes. But then you could have a NullObject to represent an absence of value that you could assign to the Value property for every derived class.

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You can use the abstract factory pattern. Consider this example:

// Base class

class Button
{
    protected Button()
    {
    }

    public string Name { get; set; }
}

// Factory interface

public interface ButtonFactory
{
    Button CreateButton();
}

// And the concrete classes

class WindowsButton : Button
{
    // ...
}

class WindowsButtonFactory : ButtonFactory
{
    public Button CreateButton()
    {
        return new WindowsButton();
    }
}

class MacButton : Button
{
    // ...
}

class MacButtonFactory : ButtonFactory
{
    public Button CreateButton()
    {
        return new MacButton();
    }
}

Furthermore, you can combine the abstract factory pattern with the strategy pattern to encapsulate the custom behaviors that change with type.

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