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I'm trying to display a list of alarms in a WPF ListVieuw. To accomplish this I databinded the Listbox to a property containing the list of alarms. Since I use the MVC programming paradigm the property is located in the controller, and the datacontext of the view is set to that controller.

I noticed that when I added an alarm to the list, the view didn't display the new alarm. After some research I found I need to use the ObservableCollection class to do this correctly.

However, displaying the list of alarms isn't the only thing that needs to be done with it, so I can't / don't want to change the variable type of the list to ObservableCollection.

I now tried to make a property of the type ObservableCollection, but this doesn't work either. This is pretty normal, since I don't add the alarm to the property, I add it to the variable, which is still of the type List.

Is there a way to tell the property when the List is updated, or an other/better way to display my alarms and keep them easy to use for other parts of the program?

Edit:

My workaround: I trigger the PropertyChanged event by clearing my property FutureEvents in the eventhandler of the PropertyChanged event from my alarms variable.

My code: class cMain { private static volatile cMain instance; private static object syncRoot = new Object();

    ObservableCollection<Alarm> alarms;

    #region properties
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the list of alarms in the model. Can't be used to add alarms, use the AddAlarm method
    /// </summary>
    public ObservableCollection<Alarm> Alarms
    {
        get
        {
            return alarms;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the ObservableCollection of future alarms in the model to be displayed by the vieuw.
    /// </summary>
    public ObservableCollection<Alarm> FutureAlarms
    {
        get
        {
            //Only show alarms in the future and alarm that recure in the future
            var fAlarms = new ObservableCollection<Alarm>(alarms.Where(a => a.DateTime > DateTime.Now || (a.EndRecurrency != null && a.EndRecurrency > DateTime.Now)));
            return fAlarms;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a desctription of the date and time of the next alarm
    /// </summary>
    public String NextAlarmDescription
    {
        get
        {
            if (alarms != null)
            {
                return alarms.Last().DateTimeDescription;
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion //properties


    #region public

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the instance of the singleton
    /// </summary>
    public static cMain Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (instance == null) //Check if an instance has been made before
            {
                lock (syncRoot) //Lock the ability to create instances, so this thread is the only thread that can excecute a constructor
                {
                    if (instance == null) //Check if another thread initialized while we locked the object class
                        instance = new cMain();
                }
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Shows a new intance of the new alarm window
    /// </summary>
    public void NewAlarmWindow()
    {
        vNewAlarm newAlarm = new vNewAlarm();
        newAlarm.Show();
    }

    public void AddAlarm(Alarm alarm)
    {
        alarms.Add(alarm);            
    }

    public void RemoveAlarm(Alarm alarm)
    {
        alarms.Remove(alarm);
    }

    public void StoreAlarms()
    {
        mXML.StoreAlarms(new List<Alarm>(alarms));
    }

    #endregion //public

    #region private

    //Constructor is private because cMain is a singleton
    private cMain()
    {
        alarms = new ObservableCollection<Alarm>(mXML.GetAlarms());
        alarms.CollectionChanged += new System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventHandler(alarms_CollectionChanged);
    }

    private void alarms_CollectionChanged(object sender, System.Collections.Specialized.NotifyCollectionChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        FutureAlarms.Clear(); //Needed to trigger the CollectionChanged event of FutureAlarms
        StoreAlarms();
    }


    #endregion //private
}
share|improve this question

WPF reacts on the PropertyChanged event of the INotifyPropertyChanged interface, so you should implement this interface and raise the event when you change properties in your model. If you do this, you don't need to use ObservableCollection<T> at all. But be aware that if your property is a List and the only thing you have done is add or remove items, WPF will still think it's the same list and do nothing. Therefore, before you raise the PropertyChanged event, you need to set you property to a new instance of a list, which is easily done like this:

MyList.add(newItem);
MyList = new List<something>(MyList);
#raise the event
share|improve this answer
    
A list does not implement the INotifyPropertyChanged, so how do I raise the PropertyChanged event? – Bitbored Apr 21 '12 at 20:15
    
@Bitbored, your controller should implement it. – Klaus Byskov Pedersen Apr 21 '12 at 20:24

Instead of recreating the ObservableCollection with the future alarms on every get, try to update the collection directly when the list changes:

public ObservableCollection<Alarm> FutureAlarms { get; private set;} // initialize in constructor

private void UpdateFutureAlarms() {
    fAlarms.Clear();
    fAlarms.AddRange(
        alarms.Where(
            a => a.DateTime > DateTime.Now 
                || (a.EndRecurrency != null && a.EndRecurrency > DateTime.Now)
        )
    )
}

//... somewhere else in the code... 

public void Foo () {
    // change the list
    alarms.Add(someAlarm);
    UpdateFutureAlarms();
}

You could also register UpdateFutureAlarms as an event handler, if you had an event fired when the List changes.

share|improve this answer

You would be better off deriving your own class from ObservableCollection<T> and using that instead of trying to encapsulate both existing classes in a combination as you did. As to why:

  • first, it will be much less painful, since ObservableCollection<T> already implements all interfaces that List<T> supports, so you only need to implement the methods you actually need directly from List<T> and WPF data binding will just work;
  • second, the only realistic other alternative, the INotifyPropertyChanged approach is cumbersome to implement (you'll effectively rewrite ObservableCollection<T>) or it will result in bad performance with larger collections if you replace them with a new one after every change just to get the binding to update.
share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that the view is but a small part of the program. There are a lot of other classes and a lot of code, all using List<Alarm> to do stuff with the alarms. If I change the class of the list in the main controller to ObservableCollection, the best case scenario is that I only lose consistency, the worst case is that I need to change a lot of code in order to make it work correctly. – Bitbored Apr 21 '12 at 20:30
    
I'm also not sure if changing the type to ObservableCollection will work, since I add the alarm to the alarms variable of my controller, but I databind my listview to a property FutureAlarms, that will handle the result nor raise a new PropertyChanged event. – Bitbored Apr 21 '12 at 20:36
    
I see. However, your data binding woes will not just go away, so here's something you could try. Instead of using List<Alarm> directly, either set up a class alias (e.g. "using AlarmList = List<Alarm>;") or derive a class named AlarmList from List<Alarm>, and blanket update all old List<Alarm> references. Then start experimenting with a new AlarmList: ObservableCollection<Alarm> class, knowing that going back to List<Alarm> is just a few characters away. As I said, if you want hassle-free data binding, (deriving from) ObservableCollection<T> is the best choice. – Alan Apr 21 '12 at 20:37

Add a property to Alarm

public bool Future 
{   get return (DateTime > DateTime.Now 
            || (EndRecurrency != null && EndRecurrency > DateTime.Now));  
}

When up update Alarms call NotifyPropertyChanged on Future for all (or an appropriate subset).

Then use a DataTrigger or CollectionViewSource Filter to hide it

<DataTrigger Binding="{Binding Path=Future, Mode=OneWay}" Value="False">
                                <Setter Property="Visibility" Value="Collapsed"/>
                            </DataTrigger> 

Filtering or hiding is kind of at the presentation level so it should leave you Alarm class and Alarms collection whole for for business and data layers.

Since ObservableCollection implements iList is should be compatible.

With you current model FurtureAlarms might as well be a List. Can shorten the syntax

 (alarms.Where(a => a.DateTime > DateTime.Now || (a.EndRecurrency != null && a.EndRecurrency > DateTime.Now))).toList(); 
share|improve this answer

In WPF, binding to collections correctly needs that the collection bound to implements INotifyCollectionChanged which has the CollectionChanged Event that should be fired whenever an item is added or removed from the collection.

So you're advised to use the ObservableCollection<T> class which already implements that interface for you. And concerning the List<T> variables you use I think it's better that you switch them to the interface type IList<T> instead which is implemented also by ObservableCollection and as an additional benefit the parts of your application that don't need the ObservableCollection notification won't need to add additional references or know about the Observable collection.

share|improve this answer

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