Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I Have a text file with more than 1 million lines. The individual lines are not very big (about 200-270 characters each).

I am trying to randomly pick 60% of the number of lines in input, where each line can be repeated in the output. In the above example, my output would have 600,000 lines, but only 500,000 lines out of them might be unique. I also need the lines which were not picked at all, in a different output file. Any individual line should not appear in both the output files.

Each line in a input file has a record like below.

  • Record1
  • Record2
  • Record3
  • Record4
  • Record5
  • Record6
  • Record7

If I am trying to pick 5 random lines in a file output1.txt, where each line can be repeated. Lets say following were the lines picked and are in output1.txt

  • Record3
  • Record5
  • Record2
  • Record2
  • Record5

The remaining records should go to output2.txt.

  • Record1
  • Record4
  • Record6
  • Record7

The order of the records does not matter.

I think I can write code to do this using Java, but I was wondering I can do it quickly using some command or scripting. I tried using 'shuf' to pick the lines, but how can I then make sure that the lines which have been picked, don't appear in the second output I am trying to get.

I am working on a Linux machine. Any suggestions or comments are welcome. Thanks.

share|improve this question
6  
whathaveyoutried.com - What have you tried? This isn't a place to get code written for you. –  Lattyware Apr 21 '12 at 20:16
    
Sounds to me like the first part's pretty easy (a few simple lines of php or whatever) but the second part, i.e., outputting separately the ones that weren't in the first part, makes it harder... –  Ben Apr 21 '12 at 20:19
1  
I am sorry if It sounds like I am looking for someone to tell me the code. What I am looking for is any ideas or commands which already do what i need. BY the way i already wrote in the question what i tried. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 20:20
    
@Ben: exactly where i am stuck. I can get the output for 1st part by simply using 'shuf' command. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 20:21
    
You must clarify and be very explicit. Exactly what should each of these two files have? If I interpret you correctly... the mathematical jargon you are looking for is as follows: You have a set of 1 million elements and you wish to pick sample elements "without replacement". Additionally, you want this to partition your set into two sets: the picked and unpicked elements. Indeed, if you are representing the set as an array, you can shuffle the array and split it in two: let the first 60% of elements be chosen, and let the remaining 40% of the elements by unchosen. What is the problem? –  ninjagecko Apr 21 '12 at 20:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This randomly picks one line of the N lines of the file until N/6 lines are picked. The rate of duplicates is not controlled.

To save memory, we'll keep the file position of the lines in memory instead of the lines themselves. Tie::File does that for us.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::File  qw( );

my ($input_qfn, $picked_qfn, $unpicked_qfn) = @ARGV;

tie(my @lines, 'Tie::File', $input_qfn, autochomp => 0)
   or die;

my $num_lines = @lines;
my @unpicked_indexes = 0..$num_lines-1;
my @picked_indexes;
for (1..$num_lines*.6) {
   my $rnd_idx = int(rand($num_lines));
   $unpicked_indexes[$rnd_idx] = undef;
   push @picked_indexes, $rnd_idx;
}

open(my $picked_fh, '>', $picked_qfn)
   or die $!;
print($picked_fh $lines[$_]) for @picked_indexes;

open(my $unpicked_fh, '>', $unpicked_qfn)
   or die $!;
print($unpicked_fh $lines[$_]) for grep defined, @unpicked_indexes;
share|improve this answer
    
Added the missing bits to make this a runnable script. –  ikegami Apr 21 '12 at 22:26
1  
@downvoter: what is the problem here? –  Borodin Apr 21 '12 at 23:07
    
@ysth, Thank you. –  ikegami Apr 23 '12 at 14:50

Here is a Perl solution.

I seem to be writing this a lot recently, but indexing a very large text file is the best way to get random access to it without reading the entire file into memory.

This program uses the tell operator to establish the offset of the current record within the source file, the seek operator to return to a specific record, and vec to keep track of which records have been selected.

Note that the do { ... } while EXPR form executes the do-block before first checking the condition, and has been chosen specifically for this purpose.

The program expects the file to be scanned for data to be specified on the command line. The output files are selected.txt for the 60% selected and unselected.txt for the remainder.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $file = shift or die "No input file specified";

open my $infh, '<', $file or die qq(Unable to open "$file" for input: $!);
my @index;
do { push @index, tell $infh } while <$infh>;

my $used = "\0" x (@index / 8 + 1);

my $outfh;

open $outfh, '>', 'selected.txt' or die $!;
my $n = 0;
while ($n++ / @index < 0.6) {
  my $rec = int rand scalar @index;
  seek $infh, $index[$rec], 0;
  print $outfh scalar <$infh>;
  vec($used, $rec, 1) = 1;
}

open $outfh, '>', 'unselected.txt' or die $!;
for my $rec (0 .. $#index) {
  next if vec($used, $rec, 1);
  seek $infh, $index[$rec], 0;
  print $outfh scalar <$infh>;
}

Edit

I hesitate to use a module to replace so little code, but here is a version using Tie::File as ikegami recommends in case anyone prefers this approach.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::File;

my $file = shift or die "No input file specified";

tie my @index, 'Tie::File', $file, mode => O_RDONLY
    or die qq(Unable to open "$file" for input: $!);

my $outfh;
my @used;

open $outfh, '>', 'selected.txt' or die $!;
my $n = 0;
while ($n++ / @index < 0.6) {
  my $rec = int rand scalar @index;
  print $outfh $index[$rec], "\n";
  $used[$rec]++;
}

open $outfh, '>', 'unselected.txt' or die $!;
for my $rec (0 .. $#index) {
  print $outfh $index[$rec], "\n" unless $used[$rec];
}
share|improve this answer
    
For furture reference, you might want to check Tie::File. I used it in my previously posted solution because it does all the tell and seek for you. vec() is a nice touch, but that kind of memory savings are probably not required. –  ikegami Apr 21 '12 at 22:31
1  
@downvoter: what is the problem? –  Borodin Apr 21 '12 at 23:05

You can do it in bash script using this code:

without repetition of lines in the output:

#!/bin/bash

lines=$(wc -l inputfile.txt | awk '{print $1}')

echo $lines

# computation of percentage of random lines we
# want to pick e.g. 60%
let percentage=$((lines*60/100))

echo $percentage

# pick the random lines
random_lines=$(sort -R inputfile.txt | head -n $percentage)

# show the random lines
echo $random_lines

with repetition of lines in the output:

#!/bin/bash

lines=$(wc -l inputfile.txt | awk '{print $1}')

echo $lines

# computation of percentage of random lines we
# want to pick e.g. 60%
let percentage=$((lines*60/100))

echo $percentage

# pick the random lines
for ((i=1; i<$percentage; i++))
do
  echo $(sort -R inputfile.txt | head -n 1)
done
share|improve this answer
1  
Again, this doesn't allow for the requirement that each line can be repeated in the output. –  Borodin Apr 21 '12 at 20:54
1  
@Thanasis Petsas: Thanks. But is sorting the entire file again and again a good idea, since the input file is as big as 1 million records. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 21:01

The mathematical jargon you are looking for is as follows: You have a set of 1 million elements and you wish to pick sample elements "with replacement"; furthermore you wish to know the elements which were not picked.

universe = range(10**6)  # or whatever your elements are
numElementsToChoose = int(0.6*len(universe))

chosen = [random.choice(universe) for _ in range(numElementsToChoose)]
unchosen = set(universe) - set(chosen)

Demo:

>>> len(chosen), len(unchosen)
(600000, 548815)

(This code is inelegant because universe should be a set, but python doesn't natively support picking a random element from a set, only a sequence... ugh.)

share|improve this answer
    
I assume by set you mean a set data structure. A set data structure cannot have repeated records. Moreover, The summation of choosen and remaining can be more than the original number of lines (1000000), since records can be repeated in choosen. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 21:08
    
@NishantNagwani: oops, thanks, edited. One also use collections.Counter, but if one is content storing chosen as a list, this works too. –  ninjagecko Apr 21 '12 at 21:10

Example ~ 10% in STDOUT twice, another 50% in STDOUT once, rest 40% in STDERR

awk 'BEGIN {srand()} !/^$/ { r = rand(); if (r <= .60) print $0; if (r <= 0.10) print $0; if (r > .60) print $0 > "/dev/stderr"; }'

Note: Redirect STDOUT to one file > file1 and STDERR to other file 2> file2 ...

share|improve this answer
1  
I am very grateful to your for your help. But,The question clearly mentioned "I also need the lines which were not picked at all, in a different output file. Any individual line should not appear in both the output files." The only change I did was included the example. Please Read comments on the question. Thanks again. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 21:28
    
I think it doesn't cover the repetition case. –  Nishant Nagwani Apr 21 '12 at 21:56

If you have shuf, you probably have comm, which has the -3 option to compare two sorted files and output the lines found in only one file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.