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I am working on a java application and we build a 32 and 64 bit version of it. The software uses native code, so the 32 and 64 bit versions need to package the appropriate libraries.

Currently on our build server (jenkins), we build both the 32 and 64 bit in a single project. The reason for that is because we want to keep the two builds in sync - basically if one fails, we don't want to deploy some features on a 32-bit version but not the 64-bit version. Since the underlying code base is the same and just the libraries are different, I think the build numbers should always be the same as well.

This solution works, but it takes twice as long to build because its doing a two pass build. If I split them up into separate projects, then there is no guarantee that the 32 and 64 bit versions will stay in sync in terms of build numbers and build status.

It sounds like what I'm really after is a parent build that has two children - the 32 and 64 bit build. What I'm not sure of is if this should be handled on the build server, or maybe as a multi module project in maven. Having a multi-module project doesn't seem quite right though since only the libraries are different, not any of the code.

Has anyone worked with this situation and can provide guidance here?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the multi-configuration job would be a perfect match for your situation. I won't help with the build time though. The only thing that helps is building 32 and 64 bit versions at the same time. If your build server is not beefy enough to handle that, you could get another server and add that as a slave to Jenkins. Then assign 32 bit configuration to build on one and 64 bit configuration to build on the other.

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Thanks, I think this is what I was looking for. – Jeff Storey Apr 22 '12 at 14:02

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