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I have been trying to find out if there is a better way to initialize the string array I am using in this code snippet. I was wondering if there was a function, or perhaps some use of new that would make the calling and assignment of all the empty strings in the code unnecessary. So I can initialize them at the same time I create the array.

                    foreach (var unit in unitList)
                    {
                        //Sort units by each army
                        string unitName = unit.UnitName;
                        armyUnits.Add(unitName, unit);

                        //Sort unit properties by unit
                        List<string> properites = new List<string>();

                        string composition        ="";
                        string weaponSkill        ="";
                        string ballisticSkill     ="";
                        string strength           ="";
                        string initiative         ="";
                        string toughness          ="";
                        string wounds             ="";
                        string attacks            ="";
                        string leadership         ="";
                        string savingThrow        ="";
                        string specialRules       ="";
                        string dedicatedTransport ="";
                        string options            ="";
                        string armour             ="";
                        string weapons            ="";


                        properites.AddRange(new string[15]{

                        composition            = unit.Composition,
                        weaponSkill            = unit.WeaponSkill,
                        ballisticSkill         = unit.BallisticSkill,
                        strength               = unit.Strength,
                        initiative             = unit.Initiative,
                        toughness              = unit.Toughness,
                        wounds                 = unit.Wounds,
                        attacks                = unit.Attacks,
                        leadership             = unit.Leadership,
                        savingThrow            = unit.SaveThrow,
                        specialRules           = unit.SpecialRules,
                        dedicatedTransport     = unit.DedicatedTransport,
                        options                = unit.Options,
                        armour                 = unit.Armour,
                        weapons                = unit.Weapons
                        });


                    }

edit: So it looks like you can do new String(unit.Composition.ToCharArray()) inside the array. I don't think that is any more readable or quicker to write though.

  properites.AddRange(new string[1]{
  new String(unit.Composition.ToCharArray())}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you write "new String(unit.Composition.ToCharArray())"? You could write "unit.Composition" directly. – usr Apr 21 '12 at 20:59
    
Do you require using a List or could you use an array directly? I added a new alternative to my answer. – usr Apr 22 '12 at 12:46
up vote 4 down vote accepted
                    foreach (var unit in unitList)
                    {
                        //Sort units by each army
                        string unitName = unit.UnitName;
                        armyUnits.Add(unitName, unit);

                        //Sort unit properties by unit
                        List<string> properites = new List<string>();

                        properites.AddRange(new string[15]{

                        unit.Composition,
                        unit.WeaponSkill,
                        unit.BallisticSkill,
                        unit.Strength,
                        unit.Initiative,
                        unit.Toughness,
                        unit.Wounds,
                        unit.Attacks,
                        unit.Leadership,
                        unit.SaveThrow,
                        unit.SpecialRules,
                        unit.DedicatedTransport,
                        unit.Options,
                        unit.Armour,
                        unit.Weapons
                        });


                    }

You don't need the variables at all. Actually, you don't need a list!

                    var properties = new [] {
                        unit.Composition,
                        unit.WeaponSkill,
                        unit.BallisticSkill,
                        unit.Strength,
                        unit.Initiative,
                        unit.Toughness,
                        unit.Wounds,
                        unit.Attacks,
                        unit.Leadership,
                        unit.SaveThrow,
                        unit.SpecialRules,
                        unit.DedicatedTransport,
                        unit.Options,
                        unit.Armour,
                        unit.Weapons,
                    }

A list supports adding and deleting items which seems not to be used here. You also don't need the array count of 15 because the compiler figures it out. You also don't need the array type for the same reason. C# is a pretty terse language!

I also added a final comma after "unit.Weapons" to make all list items symmetric. This compiles just fine and makes copying, pasting and reordering simpler.

share|improve this answer
    
Do'h, thank you. – Amicable Apr 21 '12 at 21:15
    
That is a very comprehensive example thanks for taking the time to write it :) I would just be using this list to reference stored values, so an array would work fine. No real performance benefits from what I've read, but nice and neat! – Amicable Apr 22 '12 at 23:33
1  
Performance benefits are definitely there (you save two object allocations, an array copy and indirection at each and every access). – usr Apr 23 '12 at 7:37

You also don't need to use the AddRange method. You can simply use the collection initialization syntax.

//Sort unit properties by unit
var properites = new List<string>
                     {
                         unit.Composition,
                         unit.WeaponSkill,
                         unit.BallisticSkill,
                         unit.Strength,
                         unit.Initiative,
                         unit.Toughness,
                         unit.Wounds,
                         unit.Attacks,
                         unit.Leadership,
                         unit.SaveThrow,
                         unit.SpecialRules,
                         unit.DedicatedTransport,
                         unit.Options,
                         unit.Armour,
                         unit.Weapons
                     };
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for showing me this example! I had to double check after reading this that it wasn't in plain sight on MSDN (it's not), I did think it was unusual to actually have to use an array. – Amicable Apr 22 '12 at 1:19
    
This is good. I tried to improve even on this solution by updating my answer ;-) – usr Apr 22 '12 at 12:12

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