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I realize similar questions have been asked before, but I read a couple of those and still don't see where I'm going wrong. When I simply write my class without separating the prototype from the definition, everything works fine. The problem happens when I separate the prototype and definition as shown below:

template<class T> class VisitedSet { 
public:
    VisitedSet(); 
    int getSize(); 
    void addSolution(const T& soln); 
    void evaluate(); 
private:
    vector<T> vec;
    int iteration;
};

And as an example of a definition that gives me this error:

int VisitedSet::getSize() {
    return vec.size();

I've never made a templated class before, so please pardon me if the problem here is trivial.

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Note: In most cases you want the definitions of the template member functions accessible in the header. If the definitions are in the header, remember to mark them as inline (or define them inside the template class definition), if they are not, think twice and make sure that you do not need the definitions in the header (you do not need the definitions in a header if you explicitly instantiate in the translation unit that contains the definition for all types with which you want to use the template). I fear that you are going to get bit by this quite soon... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 21 '12 at 21:50
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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

VisitedSet is a template, not a class, so you can’t use VisitedSet in a nested name specifier such as VisitedSet::getSize(). Just as you specified the declaration of class VisitedSet<T> for all class T, you must specify the definition of VisitedSet<T>::getSize() for all class T:

template<class T>
int VisitedSet<T>::getSize() {
//            ^^^
    return vec.size();
}

The name of a template can, however, be used as though it were a class within a template definition:

template<class T>
struct Example {
    Example* parent;
    T x, y;
};

In this case, Example is short for Example<T>.

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You want this:

template <class T>
int VisitedSet<T>::getSize() {
    return vec.size();
}
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You have to state the template parameter in the definition as well

template<class T>
int VisitedSet<T>::getSize() {
    return vec.size();
}

otherwise the compiler cannot match it to the declaration. For example, there could be specializations for some parameter types.

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I see. Thanks everyone. –  synaptik Apr 21 '12 at 21:13
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You need to let your compiler know that you are implementing a method in template function:

 template<typename T>
 int VisitedSet<T>::getSize() {
    return vec.size();
 }
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Try putting

template <typename T>

above the implementation of VisitedSet::getSize() -- but beware that, in general, templated classes and functions should all be inlined. See the c++ faq here for more information.

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when I put template<class T> immediately above the line with int VisitedSet::getSize() {, I get precisely the same error. Is it preferred that I not separate the prototype from the definition? Is that what is meant by inlining in this context? –  synaptik Apr 21 '12 at 21:12
    
@synaptic You also need to use the template argument in the class as me other have suggested in the other answers. –  d_inevitable Apr 21 '12 at 21:13
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