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I'm working on a project that involves a dynamically allocated 2D array of structs. Inside each of these structs is a dynamically allocated array of ints. The program is executing perfectly, but when it comes time to clean up when I have more than one member of the second dimension of my array, I get this error:

*** glibc detected *** cache: double free or corruption (out): 0x0000000009f172f0 ***

There is a lengthy backtrace and memory map that follows it, and if that would be helpful, I'd be glad to provide it. Here's what my allocation and deallocation code looks like: Here is what is in the block struct:

typedef struct blockStruct {
  int valid;
  int tag;
  int dirty;
  int mru;
  int* data;
} block;

Allocation: When blocksPerSet is bigger than 1, the deallocation fails.

 /* Make cache */
  block** cache;
  cache = malloc(numberOfSets * sizeof(block*));
  for (i = 0; i < numberOfSets; i++) {
    cache[i] = malloc(blocksPerSet * sizeof(block));
  }
  int j = 0;
  for (i = 0; i < numberOfSets; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < blocksPerSet; j++) {
      cache[i][j].valid = 0;
      cache[i][j].data = malloc(blockSizeInWords*sizeof(int));
      cache[i][j].mru = 0;
    }
  }

Deallocation:

 for (i = 0; i < numberOfSets; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < blocksPerSet; j++) {
      free(cache[i][j].data);
    }
    free(cache[i]);
  }
  free(cache);

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: I narrowed the problem down to one of two functions. They are saveToCache and loadToCache, and are functionally very similar. The main function is a loop that will always call loadToCache first, and then may call saveToCache or may call loadToCache. If I comment out one of these two calls, regardless of which one, I don't get any errors.

EDIT2: I also realized that the error only happens if I use saveToCache before using loadToCache.

int saveToCache(block** cache, int blockSizeInWords, int numberOfSets,
            int blocksPerSet, stateType* statePtr, int address,
            int saveData)

  int setNumber = (address / blockSizeInWords) % numberOfSets;
  int targetTag = address / blockSizeInWords / numberOfSets;
  int offset = address % blockSizeInWords;
  int blockStart = address / blockSizeInWords * blockSizeInWords;
  int i = 0;
  /* If a hit is found, set MRU and return */
  for (i; i < blocksPerSet; i++) {
    if (cache[setNumber][i].valid == 1) {
      if (cache[setNumber][i].tag == targetTag) {
        cache[setNumber][i].mru = 1;
        cache[setNumber][i].data[offset] = saveData;
        cache[setNumber][i].dirty = 1;
        printAction(address, 1, processorToCache);
        return cache[setNumber][i].data[offset];
      }
    }
  }
  int j;
  /* Find out if there is an empty space.  If so, allocate and return */
  for (i = 0; i < blocksPerSet; i++) {
    if (cache[setNumber][i].valid == 0) {
      cache[setNumber][i].valid = 1;
 cache[setNumber][i].tag = targetTag;
      cache[setNumber][i].dirty = 1;
      cache[setNumber][i].mru = 1;
      for (j = 0; j < blockSizeInWords; j++) {
         cache[setNumber][i].data[j] = (*statePtr).mem[blockStart + j];
      }
      printAction(blockStart, blockSizeInWords, memoryToCache);
      cache[setNumber][i].data[offset] = saveData;
      printAction(address, 1, processorToCache);
      return cache[setNumber][i].data[offset];
    }
  }
  int allMRUSet = 1;
  /* Find LRU and replace */
  int evictedAddress;
  for (i = 0; i < blocksPerSet; i++) {
    /* Save back to memory if block is dirty */
    if (cache[setNumber][i].mru == 0) {
      evictedAddress = blockSizeInWords * (setNumber + cache[setNumber][i].tag
                                       * numberOfSets);
      if (cache[setNumber][i].dirty == 1) {
        for (j = 0; j < blockSizeInWords; j++)
          (*statePtr).mem[blockStart + j] = cache[setNumber][i].data[j];
         printAction(evictedAddress, 1, cacheToMemory);
      }
      else
        printAction(evictedAddress, 1, cacheToNowhere);
      cache[setNumber][i].valid = 1;
      cache[setNumber][i].tag = targetTag;
      cache[setNumber][i].dirty = 1;
      cache[setNumber][i].mru = 1;
      for (j = 0; j < blockSizeInWords; j++) {
        cache[setNumber][i].data[j] = (*statePtr).mem[blockStart + j];
      }
      printAction(blockStart, blockSizeInWords, memoryToCache);
      cache[setNumber][i].data[offset] = saveData;
      /* Check if all MRU blocks are set.  If yes, unset all. */
      for (j = 0; j < blocksPerSet; j++) {
        if (cache[setNumber][j].mru == 0)
          allMRUSet = 0;
      }
      if (allMRUSet == 1) {
        for (j = 0; j < blocksPerSet; j++) {
          cache[setNumber][j].mru = 0;
          }
        /* Re-set most recently used block */
        cache[setNumber][i].mru = 1;
      }
      printAction(address, 1, processorToCache);
      return cache[setNumber][i].data[offset];
    }
  }
  /* If we get this far, all MRU bits are set.  Un-set all of them. */
  for (i = 0; i < blocksPerSet; i++) {
    cache[setNumber][i].mru = 0;
  }
  /* Place data in item 0 of set and set MRU */
  /* Save back to memory if block is dirty */
  evictedAddress = blockSizeInWords * (setNumber + cache[setNumber][0].tag
                                           * numberOfSets);
  if (cache[setNumber][0].dirty == 1) {
        for (j = 0; j < blockSizeInWords; j++)
          (*statePtr).mem[blockStart + j] = cache[setNumber][0].data[j];
        printAction(evictedAddress, 1, cacheToMemory);
      }
  else
    printAction(evictedAddress, 1, cacheToNowhere);
  cache[setNumber][0].valid = 1;
  cache[setNumber][0].tag = targetTag;
  cache[setNumber][0].dirty = 1;
  cache[setNumber][0].mru = 1;
  for (i = 0; i < blockSizeInWords; i++) {
    cache[setNumber][0].data[i] = (*statePtr).mem[blockStart + j];
  }
  printAction(blockStart, blockSizeInWords, memoryToCache);
  cache[setNumber][0].data[offset] = saveData;
  printAction(address, 1, processorToCache);
  return cache[setNumber][0].data[offset];
}
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What I miss here is how you use data later on. all you showed seems OK... –  MByD Apr 21 '12 at 23:03
    
Data is the array that makes up a block inside my simulated cache. It seems to be working fine (at least, the messages during execution all look right). –  user1174511 Apr 21 '12 at 23:05
    
Many heap corruption cause a crash only while calling free. –  MByD Apr 21 '12 at 23:07
    
Are you sure you are not touching the pointers (by example by doing pointer aritmethic)? Try to run the initial code and final code together, without other logic in between –  SJuan76 Apr 21 '12 at 23:07
1  
I would recommend running the program with valgrind to help find the problem. –  twain249 Apr 22 '12 at 1:48
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2 Answers

A good defensive programming technique in general is to set pointers to 0 when they don't point to anything valid; before they are allocated or after they are freed. Then when you expect to be able to free them, you can check the pointer is nonzero first, either all the time in your release build, or just for development/debug using e.g. assert() which can be set to compile away to nothing.

If your program logic doesn't rely on checking pointers are nonzero before freeing, you could wrap the zeroing in a macro or constant variable check so that you can turn it off for release builds, as an optimisation.

E.g.

#define DEBUG_FREE 1

assert(ptr);
free(ptr);
if (DEBUG_FREE)
  ptr = 0;
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No errors in the code you posted immediately jump out at me, but you don't show what a stateType is, so that makes me wonder if there's something to be found by examining the copies to/from (*statePtr).mem[]. Running off the end of malloc'd space can indeed cause failures to turn up when the space is freed.

Anyway, here are three simple ways forward, if you still haven't found the issue:

  1. Use valgrind. It is really quick & easy to install and use and great for memory leaks, double frees, etc.
  2. Add asserts in functions like saveToCache() to confirm that your computed indexes into the cache fit within the expected ranges.
  3. If the above don't find the issue, break out the other memory debugging tools, like setting MALLOC_CHECK_=1 or using libsafe as described in this nice article.

(I'm assuming the Linux environment somewhat, but much of what I wrote above applies to other enviroments.)

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