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Could anyone please explain me why I get the following error?

A.cpp: In member function ‘void A::NewObject(int)’:
A.cpp:11: error: ‘list_a’ was not declared in this scope

I tried declaring list_a i various places. Now it is in prog.cpp, in main(). I don't get it why it isn't allegedly in the scope.

My simplified code is below. My idea was to add (NewObject) an object of a class A to a list (Add) while additionally performing some sort of a test (Compare) defined within the A class.

I am a C++ beginner so I'd especially appreciate detailed answers. Thanks in advance. Here are the files:

//A.h

#ifndef A_H
#define A_H

class A
{
private:
    int id;
    int Compare(int, int);
public:
    A()
    {
        id = 0;
    }
    A(int i)
    {
        id = i;
    }
    void NewObject(int i);
};
#endif

//A.cpp

#include "A.h"
#include "List.h"

void A::NewObject(int i)
{   
    list_a->Add(i);
}

int A::Compare(int a, int b)
{
    if ( a>b ) return 1;
    if ( a<b ) return -1;
    else return 0;
}


//List.h

#ifndef LIST_H
#define LIST_H

template<typename T>
class Node
{
public:
    T* dana;
    Node *nxt, *pre;
    Node()
    {
        nxt = pre = 0;
    }
    Node(const T el, Node *n = 0, Node *p = 0 )
    {
        dana = el; nxt = n; pre = p;
    }
};

template<typename T, typename U>
class List
{
public:
    List()
    {
        head = tail = 0;
    }
    void Add(const U);
protected:
    Node<T> *head,*tail;
};

#endif


//List.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "List.h"

template<typename T, typename U>
void List<T,U>::Add(const U el)
{
    int i = 5;
    Node<T> *hlp = new Node<T>();
    head = hlp;
    if ( Compare(el,i) > i )
        std::cout << "Ok" << std::endl;
}

//prog.cpp
#include "List.h"
#include "A.h"

int main()
{
    int i = 5;
    List<class A, int> *list_a = new List<class A, int>();
    A obj;

    obj.NewObject(i);
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Well the answer is simple: you have never declared a variable named list_a in class A. Thats it.

Do it that way:

class A
{
private:
    List <int> list_a;
    int id;
    int Compare(int, int);
public:
    A()
    {
        id = 0;
    }
    A(int i)
    {
        id = i;
    }
    void NewObject(int i);
};

Remove the U template parameter from your list class.

share|improve this answer
    
I had to double check just to make sure on that one. –  chris Apr 21 '12 at 23:54
    
Yes, it is in the scope of main(). The scope of line 11 is local to that function; functions do not share local variables. Remember that main() is a function just like any other, it's just the first one called –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 21 '12 at 23:55
    
Well now it's in prog.cpp, in main(). But I've tried declaring in A.cpp and it didn't work either. How should it look like and where should I place it then? –  infoholic_anonymous Apr 21 '12 at 23:55
    
Yeah but it is accessed from class A and therefore the language expects it within the scope of class A. It has never been defined within that scope, so it is NOT in scope. Thats what the whole information hiding blablabla is all about... –  cli_hlt Apr 21 '12 at 23:56
    
For example as a member of A. Or you could pass it as (reference/pointer) parameter to A::NewObject –  DerManu Apr 21 '12 at 23:57

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