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I am trying to populate some entity objects in a very simple Hibernate example. My database consists of two tables, "Departments" (Id, Name) and "Employees" (Id, DepartmentsId, FirstName, LastName). My SQL query is simply a left join of Employees to Departments.

I have set up the annotations as specified in the Hibernate documentation, but whenever I try to serialize the entities Hibernate goes into an endless loop and eventually throws a StackOverFlowError exception. Someone answering another question of mine was able to determine that the stack overflow is happening because the "Department" object contains a set of "Employee" objects, which each contain a "Department" object, which contains a set of Employee objects, etc. etc.

This type of bidirectional relationship is supposed to be legal as per the documentation linked above (the "mappedBy" parameter in Department is supposed to clue Hibernate in; I have also tried using the "joinColumn" annotation that is commented out in the code below), and other things I have read indicate the Hibernate is supposed to be smart enough not to go into an endless loop in this situation, but it is not working for my example. Everything works fine if I change the bidirectional relationship to a unidirectional relationship by removing the Department object from the Employee class, but obviously this causes the loss of a lot of functionality.

I have also tried foregoing the annotations for the older xml mapping files and setting the "inverse" parameter for the child table, but it still produces the same problem. How can I get this bidirectional relationship working the way it is supposed to work?

Department:

package com.test.model;

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;
import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.FetchType;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.JoinTable;

import static javax.persistence.GenerationType.IDENTITY;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.OneToMany;
import javax.persistence.Table;
import javax.persistence.JoinColumn;

import org.hibernate.Hibernate;
import org.hibernate.proxy.HibernateProxy;

@Entity
@Table(name="Departments"
,catalog="test"
)
public class Department implements java.io.Serializable {

 private Integer id;
 private String name;
 public Set<Employee> employees = new HashSet<Employee>(0);

public Department() {
}


public Department(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}
public Department(String name, Set employees) {
   this.name = name;
   this.employees = employees;
}

 @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy=IDENTITY)


@Column(name="Id", unique=true, nullable=false)
public Integer getId() {
    return this.id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
    this.id = id;
}


@Column(name="Name", nullable=false)
public String getName() {
    return this.name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

@OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, mappedBy="department")
/*@OneToMany
@JoinColumn(name="DepartmentsId")*/
public Set<Employee> getEmployees() {
    return this.employees;
}

public void setEmployees(Set employees) {
    this.employees = employees;
}
}

Employee:

package com.test.model;

import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.FetchType;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.JoinTable;

import static javax.persistence.GenerationType.IDENTITY;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.JoinColumn;
import javax.persistence.ManyToOne;
import javax.persistence.Table;

@Entity
@Table(name="Employees"
,catalog="test"
)
public class Employee  implements java.io.Serializable {


 private Integer id;
 private Department department;
 private String firstName;
 private String lastName;

public Employee() {
}

public Employee(Department department, String firstName, String lastName) {
   this.department = department;
   this.firstName = firstName;
   this.lastName = lastName;
}

 @Id @GeneratedValue(strategy=IDENTITY)


@Column(name="Id", unique=true, nullable=false)
public Integer getId() {
    return this.id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
    this.id = id;
}

@ManyToOne
@JoinColumn(name="DepartmentsId", nullable=false, insertable=false, updatable=false)
public Department getDepartment() {
    return this.department;
}

public void setDepartment(Department department) {
    this.department = department;
}


@Column(name="FirstName", nullable=false)
public String getFirstName() {
    return this.firstName;
}

public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
    this.firstName = firstName;
}


@Column(name="LastName", nullable=false)
public String getLastName() {
    return this.lastName;
}

public void setLastName(String lastName) {
    this.lastName = lastName;
}
}

Department Manager (Contains the HQL query):

package com.test.controller;

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

import java.util.Iterator;

import org.hibernate.Criteria;
import org.hibernate.Hibernate;
import org.hibernate.HibernateException;
import org.hibernate.Query;
import org.hibernate.Session;

import com.test.model.Department;
import com.test.util.HibernateUtil;

public class DepartmentManager extends HibernateUtil {
public List<Department> list() {
    Session session = HibernateUtil.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession();
    session.beginTransaction();
    List<Department> set = null;
    try {
        Query q = session.createQuery("FROM Department d JOIN FETCH d.employees e");
        q.setResultTransformer(Criteria.DISTINCT_ROOT_ENTITY);
        set = (List<Department>) q.list();
    } catch (HibernateException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
        session.getTransaction().rollback();
    }
    session.getTransaction().commit();
    return set;
}
}
share|improve this question
    
Does any of the demonstrated code cause the exception or is it just during serialisation? Because if it is just during the serialisation of set that makes sense. This is because during the serialisation each entity acts as a proxy. If you were to take a department and say "give me its employees", then for each employee you were to say "Give me the department" then for each department say "Give me the Employee"... I would expect a stack overflow. A stab in the dark but if you are serialising to JSON there is the struts2-json-plugin. This serializer offers include and exclude parameters. – Quaternion Apr 22 '12 at 5:56
    
This will let you prune the tree, blocking it at the depth you want. In the case of the relationship you have provided the parameters can prune the tree for different purposes and thus this single query may best be represented by several different actions. – Quaternion Apr 22 '12 at 6:01
    
I believe that the exception is just during the serialization, so what you say makes sense. I use the XSLT result, not JSON, but the hangup is probably the same. Struts2 used to offer some include/exclude patterns but that functionality was broken at some point and never fixed. It offers an "exposedValue" parameter using OGNL expressions but I have never gotten it to work right (I can specify the list of Department objects with "[0].departmentsList," but cannot get it to specify specific fields, like "[0].departmentsList.id." Perhaps I will have to go the DTO route Bozho mentions below. – TennSeven Apr 22 '12 at 10:24
    
Struts2 version could make a difference: struts.apache.org/2.3.1.2/struts2-core/apidocs/index.html In the DTO case (+1) you can create your entities using "new" and not via hibernate and transfer the data from the hibernate objects to the POJO without any proxy magic. The xslt result type will be able to deal with these cyclic dependencies, the issue is that new objects are probably being constructed currently... so although the objects do contain the same data they are probably not the same objects (not sure about how the entities are peroxided so could be wrong). – Quaternion Apr 22 '12 at 18:26
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, you should not serialize your entities. Circular dependencies and proxies make that hard. Instead, you should manually transfer the data you need to send to a DTO (a new data-only class), and serialize it instead. It won't have the lazy collections, proxies, and whatnot.

share|improve this answer
    
I have thought about using DTOs but have not seen good examples of getting them to work. For instance, how can I grab the collection to transfer it to a DTO without triggering the circular reference? If the collection is not populated (say I didn't do a join), how do I access it to find out if it has anything I need to populate into the DTO without triggering a LazyInitializationException, or causing Hiberante to automatically run another query to populate it (which it does when using an OpenSessionInView filter)? Some good examples of how to populate DTOs in Hibernate would be quite helpful. – TennSeven Apr 22 '12 at 10:29

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