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I have a list of strings. Each string of the list has same format. I would like to convert each string into a class object (if that is the best option), so I can do some analysis of the list of class object.

As an example,

I have the following list

ls_list = ['-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 bar1',
'-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 bar2',
'-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 foo1',
'-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 foo2']

I would like to convert each of the above string into a class that has Nine members (perm, etc).

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All you are asking now is how to convert a string into an object. You don't. The string is an object. How you convert the information in the string depends on what that information is. There is no generic answer. –  Lennart Regebro Apr 22 '12 at 14:19
    
Please "blockquote" the pasted code. –  Skippy Fastol Apr 22 '12 at 16:49

3 Answers 3

You don't want to do that. Use os.listdir() and os.stat() to get the information you want.

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I was using the "ls -l" as an example. My problem has nothing to do with file listing. Thank you though. – –  Ahmed A Apr 22 '12 at 8:59

You do it something like this:

import os

data = {}
for file in os.listdir('.'):
    data[file] = os.stat(file)

This gives you the information for all the files in the current directory, as objects, as you requested. These can then be inspected, and you can use other functions to figure out the username of the userid you get, etc.

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I was using the "ls -l" as an example. My problem has nothing to do with file listing. Thank you though. –  Ahmed A Apr 22 '12 at 8:58
    
@AhmedA: Then you didn't ask a question at all. Return back when you have a real issue. –  Lennart Regebro Apr 22 '12 at 14:17

Here's one way of doing what you ask, but as others have noted, don't use this for parsing the output of ls. Also, it assumes that there are only 8 areas of whitespace in your input string separating your data. If any of the data substrings also contain whitespace, this code will fail:

class FileAttribs(object):

  ORDERED_ATTRIB_NAMES = ["permissions", "links", "owner", 
      "groups", "size", "month", "day", "time", "name"]

  def __init__(self, lsString):
    for (attrib, s) in zip(self.ORDERED_ATTRIB_NAMES, lsString.split()):
      setattr(self, attrib, s)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    ls_list = ['-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 bar1', 
               '-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 bar2', 
               '-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 foo1', 
               '-rw-r--r-- 1 ahmed None 0 Apr 21 17:10 foo2']

    files = []
    for s in ls_list:
      files.append(FileAttribs(s))

    #do stuff with files, e.g.

    for f in files:
      print f.permissions, f.name
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the response I was looking for. Thank you very much. Hats off to you for reading my post correctly and not getting side-tracked by my "mere" example and thinking I was trying to do something with file listing. Awesome. –  Ahmed A Apr 23 '12 at 4:54
    
If that's the case, could you please accept the answer by clicking on the check mark to the left? Also, the other people posting were trying to help you avoid what looked like a big mistake based on your example. What you might have wanted to do was edit your post to use an alternate set of strings once it became clear the set of strings you chose were distracting people from the answer you wanted. –  elhefe Apr 23 '12 at 15:15

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