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Say I have the following HTML:

<figure>
<img alt="Sun" src="sun.gif" width="256" height="256" />
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</figure>

If I want the text to wrap to the width of the image, I need this CSS:

figure {
    display: table;
    width: 1px;
}

If I want the image to be "responsive" — that is, be no bigger than the viewport — I need this CSS too:

img {
    max-width: 100%;
}

But combining these two results in a terrible mess! Now that the img's parent has an explicit width set, the max-width causes the whole figure to be really, really tiny (although not quite 1px).

So is it possible to use CSS (2 or 3) to achieve both an image caption wrapped to no wider than the image, and an image no wider than the viewport?

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2 Answers

Old question, but I came across the same issue and was able to come up with a fairly neat solution, inspired by this.

HTML:

<figure>
   <img src="http://www.placehold.it/300x150" alt="" />
   <figcaption>Make me as long as you like</figcaption>
</figure>​

CSS:

figure {
   background-color: #fff;
   padding: 5px;
   font-size: .875em;
   display: table;
}

figure img {
    display: block;
    max-width: 100%;
}

figcaption {
    display: table-caption;
    caption-side: bottom;
    background: #fff;
    padding: 0 5px 5px;
}​

This ensures the figcaption does not exceed the width of the figure, whilst allowing you to keep max-width on the image. Works in all good browsers and IE8+.

share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm - thanks ! But why max-width anyway ? –  Quandary Aug 22 '13 at 6:30
    
It gets a little complicated in this context (using table for the layout), but in general max-width: 100% is used for responsive designs to ensure that images never exceed the width of their container, breaking the layout. If our wrapper or figure is fluid rather than fixed then this becomes important. See A List Apart. In this instance you might want to have other styles or a fixed width on the figure for example. –  CherryFlavourPez Aug 22 '13 at 10:28
    
Not sure if this was just me but I found I had to add: width: 100%; to the figcaption selector, otherwise it was really narrow and didn't span the width of the image. –  Trevor May 23 at 18:18
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Is image scaling important? If not, then consider using background images.

PURE CSS:

<figure>
<div class="caption">
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</div>
</figure>
<style type="text/css">
figure{display:table;width:1px;position:relative;}
figure div.caption{
background:url(sun.gif) no-repeat 0 0 scroll;
width:256px;
height:256px;
position:absolute;
}
</style>

CSS WITH INLINE STYLING:

<figure>
<div class="caption" style="background:url(sun.gif) no-repeat 0 0 scroll;width:256px;height:256px;">
<figcaption>The Sun - a sinister and destructive force. Image from
the SOHO research facility.</figcaption>
</div>
</figure>
<style type="text/css">
figure{display:table;width:1px;position:relative;}
figure div.caption{position:absolute;}
</style>
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this mean I'd need a CSS declaration for each image? –  detly Apr 22 '12 at 2:50
    
It would, yes. If you were planning on rendering the HTML in a server-side loop, you could always set the background-image and dimensions with inline styling to save time (see second example). Either way, if you want the caption width to be bounded by the image dimensions, those settings are going to have to be made by hand. –  maiorano84 Apr 22 '12 at 3:26
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