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I have a helper function that takes an unsigned char array of a fixed length, and returns it as a formatted char *. However, I'm having some problems.

I tried

char* byteArrayToString(unsigned char byte[6]) {
    char t[18] = {""};
    char* str = t;
    sprintf(str, "%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X", byte[0], byte[1], byte[2], byte[3], byte[4], byte[5]);
    return str;
}

and

char* byteArrayToString(unsigned char byte[6]) {
    std::string t = "";
    char* str = t;
    sprintf(str, "%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X", byte[0], byte[1], byte[2], byte[3], byte[4], byte[5]);
    return str;
}

and

char* byteArrayToString(unsigned char byte[6]) {
    char* str = new char();
    sprintf(str, "%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X", byte[0], byte[1], byte[2], byte[3], byte[4], byte[5]);
    return str;
}

The second one results in some side effects of the value of that string being changed. The first one ends up giving me junk values and the last seg faults (but I can't figure out why).

share|improve this question
    
the last seg faults -- contemplate exactly how many chars you have allocated with new char(). :) –  sarnold Apr 22 '12 at 1:35
4  
Have you considered having your function return a std::string? If so, then is there some reason you chose not to do that? –  Greg Hewgill Apr 22 '12 at 1:36
    
@GregHewgill I'm using some libraries that require me to use character pointers in a lot of places, so it's been easier to work with just those to avoid converting back and forth. –  xdumaine Apr 22 '12 at 1:39
    
There is a c_str method for std::string that returns a const char * if the const isn't a problem you could use that. –  twain249 Apr 22 '12 at 1:41
    
@roviuser: std::string manages your memory for you, whereas char * does not. You may want to reconsider using char *, since .c_str() everywhere is probably easier than free() everywhere. –  icktoofay Apr 22 '12 at 1:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem with your first one is not in the printing, but in the returning. You're returning a pointer to an array which has been reclaimed (because it is an automatic variable, its lifetime ends when the function returns).

Instead try:

string byteArrayToString(const unsigned char* const byte)
{
    char t[18] = {""};
    sprintf(t, "%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X:%02X", byte[0], byte[1], byte[2], byte[3], byte[4], byte[5]);
    return t;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is certainly better than mine. –  Nawaz Apr 22 '12 at 2:00
1  
@Nawaz: Just showing how close the original code was to working. And yeah, the C++ standard library includes all the C library functions for a reason, sometimes, they're just more straightforward. –  Ben Voigt Apr 22 '12 at 3:26

Proper way is to return std::string as:

#include <sstream>   //for std::ostringstream
#include <string>    //for std::string
#include <iomanip>   //for std::setw, std::setfill

std::string byteArrayToString(unsigned char byte[6]) 
{
    std::ostringstream ss;
    for(size_t i = 0 ; i < 5 ; ++i)
         ss << "0X" << std::hex << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << (int) byte[i] << ":";
    ss << "0X" << std::hex << std::setw(2) << std::setfill('0') << (int) byte[5];
    return ss.str();
}

Online demo

On the callsite you can get const char* as:

std::string s = byteArrayToString(bytes);
const char *str = s.c_str();
share|improve this answer
1  
There's one too many +s in your ++i. –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 1:38
    
@chris: Oops. Fixed. –  Nawaz Apr 22 '12 at 1:39
    
Nice, but apparently a library requires the char *. –  sarnold Apr 22 '12 at 1:40
1  
You can use the c_str() method of string to get the char *. –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 1:41
1  
@Nawaz, Even if not, you can still copy it from that to something else and use it. –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 1:44

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