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What else could the code mean, if you didn't have it there? It seems unnecessary to me.

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closed as not constructive by Michael Petrotta, Erik Philips, Marc B, Tim Post Apr 23 '12 at 8:16

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3 Answers 3

the thing that jumps to mind immediately is to disambiguate between asking for a new instance of an object, and looking for a function named the same thing as some object.

class Foo
{
    public Foo() {};
}

static Foo Foo()
{
    ...
}

Foo myfoo = Foo(); // what do you want?
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It could mean the static call operator, if the language supports it. It's also a way of making the fact that it allocates memory more obvious to the programmer.

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I've never heard of the "static call operator", and no results came up for me, for C#. The second sentence doesn't make sense to me; there are an infinite amount of extra keywords that could be added, but don't actually do anything. –  Jessy Apr 22 '12 at 4:56
2  
A call operator means you can call the object like a function: obj(...). Static just means that you can call the class like a function. And yes, there is an argument against adding keywords, but the idea is that new means I just allocated a chunk of memory, which is expensive. –  ricochet1k Apr 22 '12 at 5:00

How about to avoid ambiguity?

public class Foo 
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "I'm a Foo!";
    }
}

public class Bar
{
    public void Test()
    {
        var result = new Foo().ToString();
    }

    public int Foo()
    {
        return 1;
    }
}

With the new keyword, result is "I'm a Foo!", without it, it's "1".

That aside, nothing much new to say that hasn't been said here:

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/47678/why-do-memory-managed-languages-retain-the-new-keyword

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That link seems to suggest that "new" is useless for this purpose. Why would your answer matter for C#, but not python? –  Jessy Apr 22 '12 at 22:07

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