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I am reading: http://cocoacast.com/?q=node/103

I came across this method in the above page:

-(void)foo
   {
    self->iVar = 5; //legal because we are referencing a member variable
iVar = r; // illegal because we are referencing a readonly property
     }    

I then created a project in Xcode.

Test0.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface Test0 : NSObject
{
@private int iVar;
 }
 @property (readonly, assign) int iVar;
 - (void) foo;
 @end

Test0.m

#import "Test0.h"

@implementation Test0
@synthesize iVar;

 - (void) foo
{
iVar = 5;
 }
  @end      

main.m

  #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
  #import "Test0.h"
  int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
  {

  @autoreleasepool {
    Test0 *t1 = [[Test0 alloc] init];
    [t1 foo];
    NSLog(@"%d", t1.iVar);
    }
    return 0;
     }

The result in Console is 5.

My questions:

  1. The web page mentioned above uses self->iVar = 5 I have used iVar = 5

What difference does it make?

  1. The web page mentioned above says iVar = r; // illegal because we are referencing a readonly property

Is iVar = 5 (which I have used) not same as iVar = r ? How is it not illegal?

share|improve this question
3  
That article is wrong. self->iVar = 5 and iVar = 5 are exactly the same. self.iVar = 5 would be illegal, though. –  ughoavgfhw Apr 22 '12 at 4:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

how does readonly property work?

The compiler simply does not generate or verify the existence of the setter. It will generate the getter, and that property may be backed by an ivar. As well, the setter is not declared in the class interface.

self->iVar = r;

vs

iVar = r;

What difference does it make?

None. They are identical. They are both direct assignment of the ivar. It's similar to other languages, when adding a superfluous scope resolution (e.g. this->).

The difference is when you attempt to use the setter method (e.g. self.prop = val or [self setProp:val];). In this case, the compiler will emit a warning and the runtime would throw an exception (unless you or a subclass defined the setter yourself).

The web page mentioned above says iVar = r; // illegal because we are referencing a readonly property.

That's wrong. Direct access to the ivar of a readonly property is fine if the ivar exists. You don't see an error in this case because you're accessing the ivar directly, rather than using the setter.


Other issues:

  • The article incorrectly states atomics are 'mutexed'.
  • The article incorrectly states atomic properties guarantee thread safety.
share|improve this answer
    
Justin, your answer is right, but I think it stands to include a bit more information... It could be improved. –  Itai Ferber Apr 22 '12 at 4:57
1  
@ItaiFerber working on it… actually reviewing the linked post –  justin Apr 22 '12 at 4:59
    
No worries. Just wanted to make sure you weren't going to leave it like that. Upvote from me. ;) –  Itai Ferber Apr 22 '12 at 4:59
    
@ItaiFerber Cheers -- all set now, i believe :) –  justin Apr 22 '12 at 5:07
    
Thanks for the reply @Justin . I am a little confused over few things that you have mentioned. My First Question: "The difference is when you attempt to use the setter method .." What I understand from this is: The purpose of writing a readonly property is to say "Mr. Compiler, do not create a setter. I will create it myself if I need it" rather than "I do not want a setter, I just want a getter". My second Question: They are identical. ....The difference is when you attempt to use the setter method ....I don't understand what you are trying to say here. Please forgive my newbieness. –  Rounak Apr 22 '12 at 5:43

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