Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

A class contains a std::vector<int*>. External code needs read-only access to this vector, should not be able to modify the contents (neither the pointers or their contents). Inside the class, the values may change (e.g. double_values(), and so storing them as a std::vector<const int*> is not possible.

Is there a way to return the std::vector<int*> as a std::vector<const int*> without making a copy? It feels like there should be, because const is simply operating at compile time to say what can and cannot be modified.

Code: (compile with g++ -std=c++0x)

class ReadOnlyAccess
{
public:
  ReadOnlyAccess(const std::vector<int*> & int_ptrs_param):
    int_ptrs(int_ptrs_param)
  {
  }
  const std::vector<int*> & get_int_ptrs() const
  {
    return int_ptrs;
  }
  std::vector<const int*> safely_get_int_ptrs() const
  {
    // will not compile (too bad):
    //    return int_ptrs;

    // need to copy entire vector
    std::vector<const int*> result(int_ptrs.size());
    for (int k=0; k<int_ptrs.size(); k++)
      result[k] = int_ptrs[k];
    return result;
  }
  void double_values()
  {
    for (int*p : int_ptrs)
      *p *= 2;
  }
  void print() const
  {
    for (const int * p : int_ptrs)
      std::cout << *p << " ";
    std::cout << std::endl;
  }
private:
  std::vector<int*> int_ptrs;
};

int main() {
  ReadOnlyAccess roa(std::vector<int*>{new int(10), new int(20), new int(100)});
  std::vector<const int*> safe_int_ptrs = roa.safely_get_int_ptrs();
  // does not compile (good)
  // *safe_int_ptrs[0] = -100000;
  roa.print();

  const std::vector<int*> & int_ptrs = roa.get_int_ptrs();
  // changes are made to the internal class values via the accessor! nooooo!
  *int_ptrs[0] = -100000;
  roa.print();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of vector and const –  Bo Persson Apr 22 '12 at 6:25
    
see stackoverflow.com/questions/2868485/… –  WeaselFox Apr 22 '12 at 6:27
2  
@Bo: That question doesn't answer this one, really. And WeaselFox' is irrelevant too because of the pointer indirection. –  Xeo Apr 22 '12 at 6:29
    
@Xeo - The answers to the other question tell us why it doesn't work. What other kind of answer is there? –  Bo Persson Apr 22 '12 at 6:32
    
A high-level conceptual workaround would be acceptable. How would you allow access without changing the contents in your code? Is there any way around making the copy (it feels unnecessary, and it may be the factor limiting performance). I could simply do a void* cast, but I worry it's bad design. –  Oliver Apr 22 '12 at 6:40

3 Answers 3

Returning the vector will imply a copy if you want to keep the const pointers anyway.

However, if your goal is to provide a way to use the values without modifying them, or modifying it's container, then a visitor pattern based algorithm might be a very good solution, in particular now that we can use lambda expressions:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

class Data
{
public:

    //...whatever needed to fill the values

    // here we assume that Func is equivalent to std::function< void ( int )> or std::function< void (const int& ) > and can return anything that will be ignored here.
    template< class Func > 
    void for_each_value( Func func ) const // read-only
    {
        for( const int* value : m_values ) // implicit conversion
        {
             func( *value ); // read-only reference (const &), or copy
             // if func needs to work with the adress of the object, it still can by getting a reference to it and using & to get it's adress
        }
    }


    void print() const
    {
        std::cout << "\nData values: \n";
        for_each_value( []( const int value ) { std::cout << "    "<< value << '\n'; } );
    }

    void count_values() const { return m_values.size(); }

private:

    std::vector<int*> m_values;

};



int main()
{
    Data data;
    // ... whatever needed to fill the data

    data.print();    

    std::vector<int> modified_values;
    data.for_each_value( [&]( int value ) { modified_values.push_back( value + 42 ); } );

    return 0;
}

If you understand that, and the different ways to use the values can be reduced to a few half-generic algorithms, then it will make your code simpler and allow you to keep data inside your structures instead of exposing it's the guts.

share|improve this answer
    
You do know about std::for_each, right? –  jalf Apr 22 '12 at 9:58
    
Oviously. Why do you ask, exactly? Here std::for_each used outside of the class wouldn't help as it would require to either expose the real container iterator, or make a copy, that is to be avoided by question. I could have only replaced the loop in for_each_value by a std::for_each, with no benefit. The point of my answer is that there is no copy of the container, and whatever the algorithm for traversal, you don't need to expose the content of the class IF you know what kind of traversal are needed by the users of the class. Obviously, if you don't know, embrace YAGNI. –  Klaim Apr 22 '12 at 11:45
    
That being said, some cases require that the class expose the content by iterators. But I don't think that's necessary for the specific question. –  Klaim Apr 22 '12 at 11:47
    
So how is your for-range loop expected to work if iterators aren't exposed? And if they are, how is your for_each_value different from std::for_each? YAGNI is all very well, but to me, you're applying it upside down. Why write your own for_each function when you don't need it because the standard library already does it for you? –  jalf Apr 22 '12 at 12:28
1  
It looks like I don't understand your question as I think I have answered above. Or maybe we are talking about the same loop? I'm saying exposing iterators is good if it's the purpose of the type, and I add that I don't think it's appropriate here. The type isn't a container, it hold one. It shouldn't expose it's data without control. –  Klaim Apr 22 '12 at 13:00

I am not sure of all of your requirements, but it might be possible to export a limited sub-set of the vector's interface in read-only mode. So one could implement an operator, and iterators that give access to the underlying data at const int*.

For example, this class wraps an std::vector<int*>:

class Foo {
 public:
  typedef std::vector<const int*>::iterator Iterator;
  typedef std::vector<const int*>::const_iterator ConstIterator;

 public:
  explicit Foo(const std::vector<int*>& data) : data_(data) {}
  const int* operator[](size_t n) const {return data_[n];} // return const int*
  size_t size() const {return data_.size();}
  ConstIterator begin() const { return ConstIterator(&(*data_.begin()));} // create an iterator with const int* as value_type
  ConstIterator end() const { return ConstIterator(&(*data_.end()));}
  // add non-const begin and end methods if required 

 private:
  std::vector<int*> data_;

};

Then:

int main() {

  const std::vector<int*> v{ new int(1), new int(2), new int(3) };
  Foo f(v);
  for (auto i : f) {
    std::cout << (*i) << "\n";
  }
  //for (auto i : f) (*i)*=11; // error!
  for (size_t i=0; i<f.size(); ++i) {
    //(*f[i])++; error!
    std::cout << *f[i] << "\n";
  }

}

Note that I am not very sure about the iterator adaptation part, I just put together a hack that seemed to work. There is plenty of information on how to do that properly, see for example here. The point here is that it is easier select a limited container interface to export, rather than deal with interpreting a whole vector as a vector.

share|improve this answer

You can provide a view to const values via custom iterators. An easy way would be to use boost::iterator:

#include <boost/iterator/indirect_iterator.hpp>

class ReadOnlyAccess
{
// ...
    typedef boost::indirect_iterator<const int* const*, const int> const_val_iter_type;
    const_val_iter_type cval_begin() {
        return it_t{const_cast<const int* const*>(&int_ptrs[0])};
    }
}

int main() {
    // ...
    auto x = roa.cval_begin();
    std::cout << x[0] <<' ' << x[1] << x[2] <<'\n';
    // we can still access the pointers themselves via .base() member function:
    for (int i=0; i<3; ++i)
        assert(x.base()[i] == safe_int_ptrs[i]);
    // the values are read-only, the following does not compile:
    // x[0] = -1;
    // **x.base() = -1;
    // *x.base() = nullptr;
}

If we used boost::indirect_iterator<typename std::vector<int*>::const_iterator, const int> for const_val_iter_type, we could modify the pointed values via .base() (but not directly like in e.g. x[0] = -1), so this solution is not general.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.