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I want to write a function which operates on double and any other type of number supporting multiplication and addition, yielding double as a result. The following, of course, doesn't compile, since type of (*) is t -> t -> t, so mixing different types is not allowed:

f :: (Num a) => Double -> a -> a -> Double
f x a b = a*x + b

What I want is the ability to write something like this:

f :: ...
f x a b = ... -- equivalent to a*x + b

f 1.0 (2 :: Int)    (3 :: Int)    -- returns 5.0
f 1.0 (2 :: Word32) (3 :: Word32) -- returns 5.0
f 1.0 (2 :: Float)  (3 :: Float)  -- returns 5.0

What should I do to make it work? Or maybe I'm fundamentally wrong and shouldn't be doing this? It is very strange but I didn't find anything on the internet about this.

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2  
f 1.0 ((2:+3) :: Complex Double) ((7:+4) :: Complex Double) -- returns ?? –  n.m. Apr 22 '12 at 11:26
    
Well, you are right. I probably should have written (Real a) instead of (Num a). –  Vladimir Matveev Apr 22 '12 at 11:46
    
I forget the difference between Num, Real, Floating and Fractional all the time... –  n.m. Apr 22 '12 at 13:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In RWH.chapter6 there is a nice paragraph about converting numbers between some numeric types (Table 6.4).

f :: (Real a) => Double -> a -> a -> Double
f x a b = x * (cast a) + (cast b)
  where cast = fromRational . toRational

Seems workable.

> f 1.0 (2 :: Int)    (3 :: Int)
5.0
it :: Double
> f 1.0 (2 :: Word32) (3 :: Word32)
5.0
it :: Double
> f 1.0 (2 :: Float)  (3 :: Float)
5.0
it :: Double
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fromRational . toRational arguably is its own punishment. (See comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.haskell.libraries/15565) –  geekosaur Apr 22 '12 at 11:29
    
thanks, that was helpful. I saw these functions and tried to use them, but, apparently, in wrong place. –  Vladimir Matveev Apr 22 '12 at 11:45

Using the mechanism of typeclasses for "overloading":

import Data.Word
import GHC.Float

class F a where f :: Double -> a -> a -> Double
instance F Int where f x a b = fromIntegral a * x + fromIntegral b
instance F Word32 where f x a b = fromIntegral a * x + fromIntegral b
instance F Float where f x a b = float2Double a * x + float2Double b

tests =
  [ f 1.0 (2 :: Int) (3 :: Int)
  , f 1.0 (2 :: Word32) (3 :: Word32)
  , f 1.0 (2 :: Float) (3 :: Float)
  ]
-- > tests
-- [5.0,5.0,5.0]
-- > :t it
-- it :: [Double]

See also http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Converting_numbers.

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