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I'm in the process of developing a CMS system which will run my clients sites, but I've come to a situation I tried to avoid. The hash() function requires PHP >= 5.1.2, and I obviously can't assume that all clients run this, since I won't handle everyones hosting.

Hence, I'm choosing between:

  1. Sticking with SHA1 only - less security
  2. Using SHA512 when available, otherwise SHA1 - bad compability when it's time for server upgrades
  3. Using SHA512 only - forcing the client to upgrade ASAP (bad - not always they can)

I'm appreciating all input!

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version 5.1.2 is really old (6 years to be more precise). If there are still hosting providers out there working with older versions, they're probably not very competitive and clients will avoid them because of this. Besides, a version upgrade is good once in a while, we can't just keep working with old things year after year. –  Radu Murzea Apr 22 '12 at 12:07
    
If you're talking about password hashing, then SHA-1's weaknesses are irrelevant. It's far more important to use it correctly (i.e. per-user salt and enough iterations). –  CodesInChaos Feb 8 '13 at 12:48
    
@CodesInChaos Very true. My solution was to use Bcrypt, which should provide both of your points. –  Zar Feb 8 '13 at 15:36
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The hash() function requires PHP >= 5.1.2, and I obviously can't assume that all clients run this, since I won't handle everyones hosting.

Really?!

  • PHP 5.2 is out since Nov 2006
  • PHP 5.3 is out since June 2009
  • PHP 5.4 is out for some weeks now

Running PHP < 5.1.2 means, that it is at least (!) 6 years old and thus a security issue by itself. The question which hash algorithm is more or less secure is not important anymore.

Regarding the question: sha1() (with salt) works fine for most use-cases, unless you write software for the CIA or such. The point is, that even salted md5()-hash isn't worth to get cracked on most sites.

Using SHA512 only - forcing the client to upgrade ASAP (bad - not always they can)

When they deny to update a 6 years old software, they are doomed anyway...

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Don't know why I didn't reply to this, your point is very valid. Thanks for your answer, I decided to raise the min-php-version and go with Bcrypt instead. –  Zar Feb 8 '13 at 15:37
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PHP 5.1.2 was released in '06. You can safely put this as requirement to run the CMS. If one of your clients uses 6 years old version of PHP - He'll have problems much worse than incomplience with you system. Just as your CMS won't display well in IE6 wich was the main browser in 2006.

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Very valid point. –  Zar Feb 8 '13 at 15:38
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