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Is there any reason to assign parameter values to local variables inside a method in order to use those values without changing them? I.e. like the following:

private void MyMethod(string path)
{
    string myPath = path;
    StreamReader mystream = new StreamReader(myPath);
    ...
}

Or can I always put it like this (and the code above is redundant and just not clean):

private void MyMethod(string path)
{
    StreamReader mystream = new StreamReader(path);
    ...
}

I know it works both ways, but I'd like to be sure there isn't anything I missed in my understanding.

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1  
Assuming that variable isn't used elsewhere, the only reason for the first case I can see is to aide with debugging. –  ChrisF Apr 22 '12 at 12:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's exactly the same thing, the only difference is that in the first case you make a copy of the reference (which is destroyed anyway when the method gets out of scope, which happens when the execution ends).

For better readability, stick with the second case.

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Please note this is not always the best case. In some cases this can cause issues depending on how the variable is used. See my answer below for more details. –  tsells Apr 22 '12 at 23:00

The only time you need to do this (assign locally) is if you are in a foreach loop or using Linq. Otherwise you can run into issues with modified closures.

Here is a snippet from an MSDN blog (All content below is from the link).

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/11/12/closing-over-the-loop-variable-considered-harmful.aspx

But I'm getting ahead of myself. What's the output of this fragment?

var values = new List<int>() { 100, 110, 120 };
var funcs = new List<Func<int>>();
foreach(var v in values) 
  funcs.Add( ()=>v );
foreach(var f in funcs) 
  Console.WriteLine(f());

Most people expect it to be 100 / 110 / 120. It is in fact 120 / 120 / 120. Why?

Because ()=>v means "return the current value of variable v", not "return the value v was back when the delegate was created". Closures close over variables, not over values. And when the methods run, clearly the last value that was assigned to v was 120, so it still has that value.

This is very confusing. The correct way to write the code is:

foreach(var v in values) 
{
  var v2 = v;
  funcs.Add( ()=>v2 );
}

Now what happens? Every time we re-start the loop body, we logically create a fresh new variable v2. Each closure is closed over a different v2, which is only assigned to once, so it always keeps the correct value.

Basically, the problem arises because we specify that the foreach loop is a syntactic sugar for

 {
    IEnumerator<int> e = ((IEnumerable<int>)values).GetEnumerator();
    try
    { 
      int m; // OUTSIDE THE ACTUAL LOOP
      while(e.MoveNext())
      {
        m = (int)(int)e.Current;
        funcs.Add(()=>m);
      }
    }
    finally
    { 
      if (e != null) ((IDisposable)e).Dispose();
    }
  }

If we specified that the expansion was

try
{ 
  while(e.MoveNext())
  {
    int m; // INSIDE
    m = (int)(int)e.Current;
    funcs.Add(()=>m);
  }

then the code would behave as expected.

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I prefer the second option. It makes no sense to create a new variable with the parameter. Also, from a reading perspective, it makes more sense to create a stream from a path (the one you received) instead of instantiating a "myPath" variable.

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