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Is there a way to do this in C++ without having things crash on runtime?

Right now I am declaring

vector<vector<int> > myvec(veclength);

How can I crank up veclength as high as it will go (properly)? Even at 10^7 it crashes when I should have more than enough computer memory.

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See cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/max_size and test what the max_size is on your machine. The key here is that the vector size limit is reduced as the size of vector elements increase - and since you have a vector of vector of int, the size of the outer vector is likely to be quite limited. –  Alain Apr 22 '12 at 12:29
    
What is the nature of the crash? How much memory do you have, and what is sizeof (vector<int>) on your system? Are you building for 32 or 64 bits (or something else)? –  Mike Seymour Apr 22 '12 at 13:02
1  
@John Smith - I wouldn't be so quick to accept questions until you've tested them - perhaps you should simply upvote helpful comments until you're sure of the solution - that way you may even get more input on the question. –  Alain Apr 22 '12 at 13:22
    
@Alain I agree with that. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 13:24
    
So, to be clear John Smith - you got your program working with veclength = 10^7 ? Because I could not in a simple test program. (See edits below) –  Alain Apr 22 '12 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should take take approximately 250 MiB of space1 (or less, depending on architecture) so memory definitely isn’t the problem here, and neither should max_size, which would be in the order of 1017 (≈ 2648+8+8).

I should mention that I corroborated these calculations by looking at the implementations of std::vectorin GCC' libstdc++ and LLVM's libc++, and by testing on a live system. The calculated values correspond 1:1 to the real implementations, and the OP’s code works flawlessly with veclength = 10e7.

I therefore conclude that the real cause is elsewhere.


1) Calculated by approximating the size of each individual vector by three 64 bit integers to denote begin pointer, size and capacity respectively, and assuming that an empty vector has a default capacity of 0. Actual implementations may differ but probably not by much.

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The program works for smaller limits; just not higher ones. –  John Smith Apr 22 '12 at 13:09
    
@John That’s possible but I am still convinced that the real issue is elsewhere and is simply masked until you get to a high number of values. I have in the meantime verified the max_size limits for both 32 bit and 64 bit architectures and they are definitely able to hold that many elements. Likewise, memory is definitely not a constraint here. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 13:12
    
Any idea what the problem might be? As far as I can tell, the program's logic is fairly solid –  John Smith Apr 22 '12 at 13:20
    
@KonradRudolph I have mad respect for you man, but this answer reeks of lack of research. Things don't always work out as they should in theory, and Vector really is limited by by both the std::vector implementation and limitations on the machine running the program. See the links in my answer, and the edit which gives an actual example showing a limit very close to what the asker posted. (10^9 for int, much less for higher element sizes) –  Alain Apr 22 '12 at 13:21
1  
@Alain I actually tested it after doing the calculations. But you should be able to reason about these things using calculations if you know enough about the implementations, and my tests corroborate the calculations. FWIW I’m using GCC but I also checked clang. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 13:23

Based on my comment above, I think I might have a solution for you.

See max_size and test what the max_size is on your machine. The key here is that the vector size limit is reduced as the size of vector elements increase - and since you have a vector of vector of int, the size of the outer vector is likely to be quite limited.

Here is the result one person got by running the above program. Note that a vector of int (size 4) has a max size of 1073741823 which is 10^9 Your using a vector> which will take up significantly more space, and thus significantly reduce the max size.

Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '1' is: 4294967295
Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '4' is: 1073741823
Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '8' is: 536870911
Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '4' is: 1073741823

If you change your data structure to be a vector of vector<int> pointers, you'll be able to store many more. I know this may fundamentally change a lot of your corresponding functions and structures, but that's the limitations of vector.


To whom it may concern: http://codepad.org/nAoPi7cV

int main()
{
   std::cout << "Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '" 
             << sizeof( std::vector<int> ) << "' is: "
             << std::vector<std::vector<int> >().max_size() << std::endl;
}   

Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '4' is: 1073741823

Max elements that can be inserted into a vector having elements of size '28' is: 153391689

log(153391689) ~= 8.2

So it's max_size is big enough to hold 10^7 on the codepad compiling machine. On lesser machines, it may not be.


Also note that even though this max size is given, the program segfaults on construction: http://codepad.org/agKMMEjQ

int main()
{
   std::vector<std::vector<int> > myvec(153391689);
}

Segmentation fault


If you reduce this further to the size proposed by the asker (10^7), the program crashes yet again: http://codepad.org/zMG0VCeg

std::vector<std::vector<int> > myvec(10000000);

std::bad_alloc: St9bad_alloc

Aborted.


If you reduce your attempted size further though, the program runs happily: http://codepad.org/sbMPppgx

std::vector<std::vector<int> > myvec(100000);

std::cout << myvec.size();

100000


The above program is extremely simple and encounters the exact problems the asker specified - therefore the problem does not lie elsewhere - the limitation is encountered due to the std::vector class. Codepad links have been left in for easy reference, but I got the same numbers when testing in a local environment.

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–1. I don’t believe this is the correct answer – see mine for details, max_size is big enough. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 13:10
1  
sizeof a vector is fixed regardless of the number of elements in that vector. Thus, the outer vector's max_size will not take into account the number of ints in the inner vector. –  jalf Apr 22 '12 at 13:32
    
I’m surprised that the size of the vector is 28. This is a very (!) odd implementation. I’m too lazy to look at where exactly GCC 4.1 fcks up but this number should definitely be the lowest bound, contrary to what you said, because a straight-forward implementation (and those that I looked at!) use *less memory, thus allow more elements. That codepad crashes with this code is not surprising and irrelevant, since it’s working in a very restricted environment. And the OP has already confirmed that the error is, indeed, elsewhere. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '12 at 14:06
    
@Alain: do not forget that most of the websites proposing to run your code allow only limited CPU and memory resources. And especially in C and C++, most likely run into a sandbox or VM for security reasons. –  Matthieu M. Apr 22 '12 at 14:36
    
@MatthieuM. I got around to running this code on my own machine and got the exact same numbers out. (Only difference was I never encountered any timeout errors). The fact that this solution has so many downvotes is laughable, because it's 100% accurate. The reason the asker got their problem working was that they reduced the size of their vector elements - which is exactly what I was saying. –  Alain May 3 '12 at 15:38

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