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I have this class as follows:

class nLetterFrequency
{
private:
    map<string, int> frequencyTable;

    void insert(const string& letterPerm);
    void parseFile(int n);                     //calls insert()

public:

    nLetterFrequency(int n);                   //calls parseFile()
    ~nLetterFrequency();
};

Apparently nothing is wrong with my code, it turns out that it just takes 2 to 3 minutes for it to finish (isnt that odd?). This seems fishy to me because I first coded this implementation in Java and it finishes in seconds. How can the performance between two languages be that drastic? Is this due to the differences in the way the map classes are implemented in c++ and Java? In Java I am using a TreeMap, I also used a HashMap but switched to the TreeMap because I wanted to sort my map. Here is the code for the parseDictionary function, and insert function. The constructor calls parseDictionary() and that is it.

void nLetterFrequency::parseDictionary(int n)
{
    ifstream infile("3dictionary.txt");     //length of words >= 3                 


    while(!infile.eof())                    //while we are not at the end of the file
    {
        string word;

        getline(infile, word);         

        if(word.length() < n)
        {
        printf("Error: check the dictionary file since word.length() < n\n");
            exit(0);   //quit the program
        }

        for(int i = 0; i < word.length() - n + 1; i++)
        {
            string perm("");
            for(int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {
                perm += word[i+j];
            }

            insert(perm);
        }

    }

    infile.close();
}


void nLetterFrequency::insert(const string& letterPerm)
{
    if(frequencyTable.count(letterPerm))                         //letterPerm is already in frequencyTable
    {
        frequencyTable.find(letterPerm)->second++;               //increment the current frequency of entry letterPerm
    }
    else                                                               //insert the new permutation into frequencyTable
    {
        frequencyTable.insert(pair<string, int>(letterPerm, 1));
    }
}

Thanks for all the help, I appreciate it!

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2  
can you show the code of the constructor ? –  Roee Gavirel Apr 22 '12 at 14:09
2  
How do you allocate the map with new if your data member isn't a pointer to map? –  juanchopanza Apr 22 '12 at 14:10
2  
The map is part of the object, so it's getting constructed and destroyed automatically. Would be nice to see the code of the calling function. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 22 '12 at 14:10
    
There is no reason to call new that way in the constructor, C++ is not Java. You are dynamically allocating a std::map, copying it to a member variable, and then leaking the memory you got from new. –  Blastfurnace Apr 22 '12 at 14:26
    
@blastfurnace, Yeah I just changed that and it still does not work. And yes I have been programming to much in Java unfortunately... –  CodeKingPlusPlus Apr 22 '12 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

Seems unlikely to barf at 300,000 lines, but you'd need to do the arithmetic. How many 'strings' in 300,000 lines? Assuming you might have meant 'words', maybe that's about 5 million words. Maybe each word is 8 characters. Guessing wildly, that's perhaps 32 bytes per map node. Total around 160 MB. Not very much.

What is the constructor argument 'n' for? Are you saying it fails before you even insert the strings?

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3  
please use comment to asking leading questions and answer to actually answer them (-` –  Roee Gavirel Apr 22 '12 at 14:15
1  
There were 2 questions - one was 'does it have to do with memory allocation' and my answer was 'probably not' (with working shown). General point taken, though. –  dave Apr 22 '12 at 14:18

All memory allocation is handled inside map, so IMHO you don't need for it to be allocated twice (one time inside your constructur (implicitly)) and another time - inside the body of your constructor. Unless the map's lifetime should be greater than nLetterFrequency object.

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