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I have the following case:

   public class GeoLocation
   {
       public double Longitude { get; set; }
       public double Latitude { get; set; }
       public string LocationName { get; set; }
   }

    public abstract class Base
    {
        public abstract GeoLocation GeoLocation { get; set; }
    }

    public class Concrete : Base
    {
        public override GeoLocation GeoLocation
        {
            get;
            set;
        }
    }

Now if I create a class Concrete2 which inherits from Base as well and I want the GeoLocation object to have 1 more property:

public string Address{ get; set; }

What is the best way to implement this?

I could create a new class called GeoLocationEx : GeoLocation and place Address property there but then in my Concrete2 object, I would have 2 properties: GeoLocation and GeoLocationEx which I do not like...

I could also make the GeoLocation class partial and extend it with Address property for the Concrete2 class but I am not sure would this be a "proper" use of partial classes.

What could be the best way to do this?

Thanks in advance for your help!

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Why do you want a descendant class to work with an extended GeoLocation object? In that case, if you wanted to work with Concrete2 objects via Base's interface, you would have to check if it's Concrete2 object, not Concrete, and only then pass in the GeoLocationEx object. –  Dmytro Shevchenko Apr 22 '12 at 14:29
    
Why can't you simply add "Address" to the GeoLocation object? –  Chris Gessler Apr 22 '12 at 14:30
    
I found solution looking at this post: abstract class Request<T> where T : Parameters { T Parameters; } class Specialized : Request<SpecialParameters> { } –  Leo Kuzmanovic Apr 22 '12 at 14:47
    
Some classes that inherit from base class have different properties than the other in this GeoLocation property... –  Leo Kuzmanovic Apr 22 '12 at 14:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could probably use generics:

public class GeoLocation
        {
            public double Longitude { get; set; }
            public double Latitude { get; set; }
            public string LocationName { get; set; }
        }

        public class GeoLocationEx : GeoLocation
        {
            public double Address { get; set; }
        }

        public abstract class Base<T>
        {
            public abstract T GeoLocation { get; set; }
        }

        public class Concrete : Base<GeoLocation>
        {
            public override GeoLocation GeoLocation
            {
                get;
                set;
            }
        }

        public class Concrete2 : Base<GeoLocationEx>
        {
            public override GeoLocationEx GeoLocation
            {
                get;
                set;
            }
        }
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1  
The problem with this is that Concrete and Concrete2 does not share the same base class. –  Albin Sunnanbo Apr 22 '12 at 14:38
    
I went for the generic solution...Thanks! –  Leo Kuzmanovic Apr 22 '12 at 14:54
public class GeoLocation
{
    public GeoLocation(GeoLocation obj) {/* implement a copy constructor */}
    public GeoLocation() {/* default constructor */}

    public double Longitude { get; set; }
    public double Latitude { get; set; }
    public string LocationName { get; set; }
}

public class GeoLocationEx : GeoLocation
{
    public string Address { get; set; }
}

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract GeoLocation GeoLocation { get; set; }
}

public class Concrete2 : Base
{
    private GeoLocationEx _geoLocation;
    public override GeoLocation GeoLocation
    {
        get { return _geoLocation; }
        set
        {
            _geoLocation = new GeoLocationEx(value);
        }
    }
}

Now inside the Concrete2 class you can work directly with the private GeoLocationEx field. Also, you can expose additional public methods for Concrete2-specific stuff.

Refer to MSDN on writing copy constructors: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173116(v=vs.80).aspx

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