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I have the following awk script:

#! /bin/awk -f

BEGIN { FS = ":" }

{ print $1 " "  $2 " "  $3 " " $4 " "  }

I want to code a bash script with "#! /bin/bash", but I need to include a file with it; as the program displays the files.

#! /bin/bash

awk -f, '
FILENAME= $1
BEGIN { FS = ":" }

{ print $1 " "  $2 " "  $3 " " $4 " "  }

'

In above code, I tried to include the file but it doesnt work ?

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3 Answers 3

It's not quite clear what you want to pass here. Do you want a variable that gets a filename as value? The easiest way do that would be to use -v var=value:

#! /bin/bash

awk -v MYFILENAME="$1" '
BEGIN { FS = ":" }

{ print MYFILENAME " " $1 " "  $2 " "  $3 " " $4 " "  }
'

Note that FILENAME is a reserved variable, you cannot set it.

Or do you want to pass input files ? In that case you simply pass them past the program, as in:

#! /bin/bash

awk '
BEGIN { FS = ":" }

{ print MYFILENAME " " $1 " "  $2 " "  $3 " " $4 " "  }
' "$1"

The -f option is to include an awk script, btw. So -f, would ask AWK to include a file named ,.

On the shell level, be sure to always enclose the variables with "...", as in "$1" so you correctly handle filename with spaces.

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Well my task is: 1. Write a shell/awk script named search_hotels that can be run with any combinations of options, all or without any options: And to do this i must work with shell and inside put AWK, i dont know if i can do this with AWK. This is why i need to pass the file to AWK. so i can make options for my program. –  user1253622 Apr 22 '12 at 15:40
    
Why not split it in two files, one shell part and another AWK part? Let's call them myscript.sh and myscript.awk. Then from your shell script, you'd call awk -f myscript.awk one_or_more_filenames. –  DarkDust Apr 22 '12 at 15:42
    
ah :D i didnt thought about this :).. i will try it :). –  user1253622 Apr 22 '12 at 15:44

It's hard for me to tell from the question, but I think what you want is

#!/usr/bin/env bash

awk -F, '
{ 
  #do stuff
}' "$1"

That will run awk on the file that you pass into the shell script.

However, if you're wanting script variable replacement inside of awk, you can escape out of the literal string to get variable replacement. For example:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

filename="$1"
awk -F, '
{ 
  print "'"$filename"'"
}' "$1"

will print out the filename you passed for as many lines as you have in the file. Note that this will cause awk to treat all of those variables as literal strings. So this would work as well:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

filename="$1"
awk -F, '
BEGIN {
  awksFileName="'"$filename"'"
}
{ 
  print awksFileName
}' "$1"
share|improve this answer
    
Well my task is: 1. Write a shell/awk script named search_hotels that can be run with any combinations of options, all or without any options: And to do this i must work with shell and inside put AWK, i dont know if i can do this with AWK. This is why i need to pass the file to AWK. so i can make options for my program. –  user1253622 Apr 22 '12 at 15:39
    
I'm still not certain what exactly you're after, but see me edits. You can assign shell variables to awk variables using the same trick I was using above. –  Tim Pote Apr 22 '12 at 15:43
    
However, the easiest thing to do is to use awk's built-in FILENAME variable if all you want is know the filename. –  Tim Pote Apr 22 '12 at 15:45
    
If you want to pass a shell variable into awk, use the -v option instead of using quoting tricks. Plus, always quote "$1" -- you never know when the user will pass a string with whitespace in it. –  glenn jackman Apr 22 '12 at 21:21
    
@glennjackman I updated my answer to quote all of the $1s instead of just some of them. I see no reason not to use the quoting tricks. If you're writing an awk script that's only a few lines inside of a shell script, you don't want to have to write var1=this var2=that for each variable you want access to. It's much easier to simply write the script and quote out to the shell when you need it. Actually I can't think of a single good reason not to do that. –  Tim Pote Apr 22 '12 at 21:35

You don't actually need to use bash to pull in filename.

[ghoti@pc ~]$ cat text
one:two:three:four
cyan:yellow:magenta:black
[ghoti@pc ~]$ cat doit.awk
#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN { FS=":" }

{
  printf("%s %s %s %s\n", $1, $2, $3, $4);
}

[ghoti@pc ~]$ ./doit.awk text     
one two three four
cyan yellow magenta black
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

But as Tim suggested, it's difficult to figure out what results you're looking for, based on what you've included in your question. Do you REALLY need to be running your awk script inside bash for other reasons? Do you need the actually file NAME to be available within your awk script?

The more detailed a question you provide, the more accurate the details in the responses will be.

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