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I'm writing an application where I will have several derived classes accessed through pointers to a base class. I wish for one of these derived classes to contain a vector of pointers it's neighbors (also of the base class type) in the application, like so:

    #include <vector>

    class BaseClass
    {
    public:
        BaseClass() { }
        virtual ~BaseClass() { }
    };

    class DerivedClass : virtual public BaseClass
    {
    public:
        DerivedClass() : BaseClass() { }
        ~DerivedClass() { }
    private:
        vector<BaseClass*> Neighbors;
    };

However, get the following compiler error:

example.cpp:16: error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of ‘vector’ with no type
example.cpp:16: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘<’ token

Is this even possible? If it is possible please someone point out my mistake! The compiler should know what type a BaseClass is as it has just been declared, in fact declaring a member of type BaseClass Foo; works, so I don't understand why the vector cannot recognise BaseClass*.

Cheers!

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You didn't put either using namespace std;, using std::vector, or std::vector<...>...

#include <vector>
using std::vector; //choice 1
using namespace std; //choice 2 

class BaseClass
{
public:
    BaseClass() { }
    virtual ~BaseClass() { }
};

class DerivedClass : virtual public BaseClass
{
public:
    DerivedClass() : BaseClass() { }
    ~DerivedClass() { }
private:
    std::vector<BaseClass*> Neighbors; //choice 3
};
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5  
choice 2 is a pretty bad idea and will invariably lead to problems! choice 1 could go inside the class' scope to avoid polluting the namespace for code that includes this file. –  juanchopanza Apr 22 '12 at 16:05
    
Good points indeed. I tend to use choice 1, although your second point might change my ways as I've never thought about that. By the by, thanks for pushing me over 1k to whoever upvoted :p –  chris Apr 22 '12 at 16:06
    
Thankyou, and apologies!!! –  Rob Simpson Apr 22 '12 at 16:18
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Intended to be a comment on Answer #1: You should avoid "using ..." declarations in header files. Keep them inside implementation files (.cpp). Google's Style Guideline provides some additional information that the original poster and answer-er may find helpful: http://google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/cppguide.xml#Namespaces. I don't endorse the google styles as a whole.

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The OP isn't using using. Is this meant to be a comment on the other answer? –  Mike Seymour Apr 22 '12 at 16:35
    
Hi Mike, yes my answer was intended to be a comment on the fist solution, but because I am a new member I did not have enough points to comment. I would recommend the original poster and the the author of the first answer to have a read through google's programming guidelines for a good explanation and rational around namespaces specifically the secition on using declarations. google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/… –  Scottymac Apr 22 '12 at 16:45
    
OK Scottymac, thanks for the link. Only problem is I can't work out how to set the namespace within the class declaration! {std::vector<BaseClass*> Neighbors} gives the same error. {using std::vector} at the top of the class declaration returns: error: using-declaration for non-member at class scope. –  Rob Simpson Apr 22 '12 at 18:32
    
The using declaration needs to be near the top of your definition (.cpp) file. In Answer #1, "choice 3" is my preferred way (ie. no "using ..." statements in your header file at all. –  Scottymac Apr 22 '12 at 19:35
    
"choice 3" works a charm actually. Thank you! –  Rob Simpson Apr 23 '12 at 6:59
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