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What I did was, I wanted each user to have their own "unique" numbering system. Instead of auto incrementing the item number by 1, I did it so that Bob's first item would start at #1 and Alice's number would also start at #1. The same goes for rooms and categories. I achieved this by creating "mapping" tables for items, rooms and categories.

The query below works, but I know it can definitely be refactored. I have primary keys in each table (on the "ids").

SELECT unique_item_id as item_id, item_name, category_name, item_value, room_name
                FROM
                    users_items, users_map_item, users_room, users_map_room, users_category, users_map_category
                WHERE
                    users_items.id = users_map_item.map_item_id AND 
                    item_location = users_map_room.unique_room_id AND 
                    users_map_room.map_room_id = users_room.room_id AND 
                    users_map_room.map_user_id = 1 AND 
                    item_category = users_map_category.unique_category_id AND 
                    users_map_category.map_category_id = users_category.category_id AND 
                    users_category.user_id = users_map_category.map_user_id AND 
                    users_map_category.map_user_id = 1
                ORDER BY item_name

users_items

|  id  |  item_name  |  item_location  |item_category  |
--------------------------------------------------------
|   1  |   item_a    |        1        |      1        |
|   2  |   item_b    |        2        |      1        |
|   3  |   item_c    |        1        |      1        |

users_map_item

|  map_item_id  |  map_user_id  |  unique_item_id  |
----------------------------------------------------
|       1       |       1       |          1       |
|       2       |       1       |          2       |
|       3       |       2       |          1       |

users_rooms

|  id  |  room_name  |
----------------------
|   1  |   basement  |
|   2  |   kitchen   |
|   3  |   attic     |

users_map_room

|  map_room_id  |  map_user_id  |  unique_room_id  |
----------------------------------------------------
|       1       |       1       |          1       |
|       2       |       1       |          2       |
|       3       |       2       |          1       |

users_category

|  id  |  room_name  |
----------------------
|   1  |   antiques  |
|   2  |   appliance |
|   3  |   sporting goods |

users_map_category

|  map_room_id  |  map_user_id  |  unique_category_id  |
----------------------------------------------------
|       1       |       1       |          1       |
|       2       |       1       |          2       |
|       3       |       2       |          1       |
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1  
well you can create a view and use that query by using the view. that gives you the chance to improve it later on while not needing to alter any places where it is used (by the view). this is no real solution, but hopefully a hint ;) –  Hajo Apr 22 '12 at 16:23
    
item_value is nowhere in your tables? And please declare what you want to do if no matching row is found in a joining table. Display NULL or drop the row from the result? –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 22 '12 at 16:41
    
I neglected to include all the fields i need, but item information comes from the users_items table. –  luckytaxi Apr 22 '12 at 16:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rewriting your query with explicit JOIN conditions makes it more readable (while doing the same).

SELECT mi.unique_item_id AS item_id
     , i.item_name
     , c.category_name
     , i.item_value
     , r.room_name
FROM   users_map_item     mi
JOIN   users_items        i  ON i.id = mi.map_item_id
JOIN   users_map_room     mr ON mr.unique_room_id = i.item_location
JOIN   users_room         r  ON r.room_id = mr.map_room_id
JOIN   users_map_category mc ON mc.unique_category_id = i.item_category
JOIN   users_category     c  ON (c.user_id, c.category_id)
                              = (mc.map_user_id, mc.map_category_id)
WHERE  mr.map_user_id = 1
AND    mc.map_user_id = 1
ORDER  BY i.item_name

The result is unchanged. Query plan should be the same. I see no way to improve the query further.

You should use LEFT [OUTER] JOIN instead of [INNER] JOIN if you want to keep rows in the result where no matching rows are found in the right hand table. You may want to move the additional WHERE clauses to the JOIN condition in this case, as it changes the outcome.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, why is the JOIN on users_category different from users_room? –  luckytaxi Apr 22 '12 at 17:09
    
@luckytaxi: I use this syntax form to match two columns at once. It is synonymous with ON c.user_id, = mc.map_user_id AND c.category_id = mc.map_category_id, but shorter and (IMO) clearer. The line break is just for better readability. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 22 '12 at 18:16
    
Makes sense but why have ON c.user_id = mc.map_user_id and not one for the mapping table of the rooms? Either way, the query works fine but I was just curious. Thanks –  luckytaxi Apr 22 '12 at 19:00
    
@luckytaxi: I collected the information from your query. I have no information why you join this way - your data model and description are not complete. –  Erwin Brandstetter Apr 22 '12 at 19:10
    
LOL ... I apologize, you're right. I pasted an older version of that query. Thanks a lot for your help. –  luckytaxi Apr 22 '12 at 19:12

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