Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a containing div (contentBody) that is N% wide. Within that div I have two other divs, contentLeft and contentRight.

contentLeft is always 205px. I want contentRight to automatically fill the remaining space in contentBody. How can I achieve this?

#div contentLeft{
  width:205px;
  float:left;
}

#div contentRight{
  width:<**100% - 205px**>;
  float:left;
}

Edit: Sorry, I meant to write "N%" instead of 100%, this needs to work for a containing area of any percentage or size.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The following should do it:

#contentBody{
  width:N%
}
#div contentLeft{
  width:205px;
  float:left;
}

#div contentRight{
  margin-left:205px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works perfectly in every scenario I've tried, thank you! –  GenericTypeTea Jun 23 '09 at 9:25

the easiest thing to do is to position them both absolutely then set contentleft to the desired with and add margin-left equal to that same width - as follows:

#div contentLeft{
  position:absolute;
  top:0;
  left:0;
  width:205px;
}

#div contentRight{
  position:absolute;
  width:100%;
  top:0;
  left:0;
  margin-left:205px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to be taking width from the page, instead of my containing div? –  GenericTypeTea Jun 22 '09 at 12:57
    
what is the width of the containing div - i thought it was 100% –  Josh Jun 22 '09 at 12:59
    
Sorry, I made a mistake, I've corrected my question to reflect that. –  GenericTypeTea Jun 22 '09 at 13:05
    
just set the width of the contentRight to the same as the containing div N% wide –  Josh Jun 22 '09 at 13:20

You can put float left and width only for contentLeft

.contentLeft{
	width:205px;
 float:left;
 border:1px solid red;

}

.contentRight{
	border:1px solid red;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked in IE, but not in FireFox? –  GenericTypeTea Jun 22 '09 at 12:58

The correct way is to use CSS display:table on the wrapper and display:table-cell on the columns. This keeps your semantics correct but gives you all the benefits of tables including cells stretching to fill remaining space.

As is typical IE doesn't support this valuable CSS property so you might want to consider using a real table until it does (or perform some hacks with JS or conditional comments).

<style>
.table {display:table;}
.tr {display:table-row;}
.td {display:table-cell;}
</style>

<div class="table" style="width:100%">
  <div class="tr">
    <div class="td" style="width:205px"><!-- left --></div>
    <div class="td"><!-- right, stretch to fit --></div>
  </div>
</div>

<!--[if ie]>
<script>
// pseudocode, IE6 doesn't support document.getElementsByClassName()
// http://robertnyman.com/2008/05/27/the-ultimate-getelementsbyclassname-anno-2008/
for (node in getElementsByClassName('table')) {node.tagName = 'table';};
for (node in getElementsByClassName('tr')) {node.tagName = 'tr';};
for (node in getElementsByClassName('td')) {node.tagName = 'td';};
</script>
<![endif]-->
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.