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I'm trying to draw a grid with random images assigned to each square. I'm having trouble with the draw sequence and potentially closure issues with the Javascript variables. Any help is appreciated.

var tileSize = 30;
var drawCanvasImage = function(ctx,tile,x,y) {
return function() {
    ctx.drawImage(tile,x,y);
    console.log("x = " + x + "/ y = " + y);
}
}

function textures(ctx) {
var grass = new Image();
var sea = new Image();
var woods = new Image();
for (var i=0; i<=10; i++) {
    for (var j=0; j<=20; j++) {
        rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*3 + 1);
        x = i * tileSize;
        y = j * tileSize;
        if (rand == 1) {
            grass.onload = drawCanvasImage(ctx,grass,x,y);
        } else if (rand == 2) {
            sea.onload = drawCanvasImage(ctx,sea,x,y);
        } else {
            woods.onload = drawCanvasImage(ctx,woods,x,y);
        }
    }
}
grass.src = "textures/grass.png";
sea.src = "textures/sea.png";
woods.src = "textures/woods.png";
}

//function called by the onload event in the html body tag
function draw() {
var ctx = document.getElementById("grid").getContext('2d');
grid(ctx);  //a function to draw the background grid - works fine
textures(ctx);
}

The current result is three drawn tiles, all at the position of x = 300 (equivalent to the i loop of 10 * the tileSize of 30) and a random y position.

After following a lead and accounting for (maybe?) closure issues by creating the variable drawCanvasImage, I at least got those three tiles to draw.

----Edit---- Working Code - Revision 2:

function randomArray() {
for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
    terrainArray[i] = [];
    for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
        rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*4 + 1);
        if (rand == 1) {
            terrainArray[i][j] = 3;
        } else if (rand == 2) {
            terrainArray[i][j] = 2;
        } else if (rand == 3) {
            terrainArray[i][j] = 1;
        } else {
            terrainArray[i][j] = 0;
        }
    }
}
}

var drawTerrain = function(ctx,tile,landUseValue) {
return function() {
    for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
        for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
            if (terrainArray[i][j] == landUseValue) {
                ctx.drawImage(tile,i*tileSize,j*tileSize);
            }
        }
    }
}
}

function textures(ctx) {
var grass = new Image();
var sea = new Image();
var woods = new Image();
var desert = new Image();
grass.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,grass,3);
sea.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,sea,0);
woods.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,woods,2);
desert.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,desert,1);
grass.src = "textures/grass.png";
sea.src = "textures/sea.png";
woods.src = "textures/woods.png";
desert.src = "textures/desert.png";
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're rewriting the onloads of the three images in every iteratiom. So, it will only execute the last-added onload f or every image.

Suggestion: run your drawing method only after the thred are loaded(and them just call drawCanvasImage every iteration without an .onload=)

Even better:store the randoms in an array, have each image independantly walk through the array on load and add copies of only itself wherever applicable .

Improvement to rev 2

function randomArray() {
for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
    terrainArray[i] = [];
    for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
        rand = Math.floor(Math.random()*4 + 1);
        terrainArray[i][j] = 4-rand; 
        //OR: replace above two lines with terrainArray[i][j]=Math.floor(Math.random()*4 + 1);. There's no need to have them in exactly reverse order.
    }
}
}

var drawTerrain = function(ctx,tile,landUseValue) {
return function() {
    for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
        for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
            if (terrainArray[i][j] == landUseValue) {
                ctx.drawImage(tile,i*tileSize,j*tileSize);
            }
        }
    }
}
}

function textures(ctx) {
var grass = new Image();
var sea = new Image();
var woods = new Image();
var desert = new Image();
grass.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,grass,3);
sea.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,sea,0);
woods.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,woods,2);
desert.onload = drawTerrain(ctx,desert,1);
grass.src = "textures/grass.png";
sea.src = "textures/sea.png";
woods.src = "textures/woods.png";
desert.src = "textures/desert.png";
}

To make it even more flexible, you could use an array to store the images, and then use length. This way, if you want to add another image, all you have to do is modify the array.

var srcArray=["textures/grass.png","textures/sea.png","textures/woods.png","textures/desert.png"];
var imgArray=[];
var terrainArray=[];
function textures(ctx){
randomArray();
    for(var i=0;i<srcArray.length;i++){
        imgArray[i]=new Image();
        imgArray[i].src=srcArray[i];
        imgArray[i].onload=drawTerrain(ctx,i);
    }
}
function randomArray() {
for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
    terrainArray[i] = [];
    for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
        terrainArray[i][j]=Math.floor(Math.random()*srcArray.length);

    }
}
}

var drawTerrain = function(ctx,index) {
return function() {
    for (var i=0; i<=(xValue/tileSize); i++) {
        for (var j=0; j<=(yValue/tileSize); j++) {
            if (terrainArray[i][j] == index) {
                ctx.drawImage(imgArray[index],i*tileSize,j*tileSize);
            }
        }
    }
}
}

So now, all you have to do is call terrain(ctx) when you want to load all the images. And, whenever you want to add an image to the list of images, just add it to the array up top. You won't have to dig deeper and modify the random values and whatnot.

share|improve this answer
    
Your suggestion worked. I've edited my question with the working code. Last question, what is the advantages of your "Even better" method? –  Josh Apr 22 '12 at 18:24
    
@Josh the first method, correctly implemented(which you havent done :p) –  Manishearth Apr 22 '12 at 18:36
    
is to have a counter, and trigger the vanvas voodoo only after you have loaded all the pics. If you have an exceptionally large one, the page will not work till it loaded. The second one displays them independantly as they load. –  Manishearth Apr 22 '12 at 18:39
    
@osh plis the second one, IMO is better practice. I hate 'increment a flag and check' algorithms :p –  Manishearth Apr 22 '12 at 18:54
    
I think I have it now. Does the edited code seem correct? Thanks for all the help. –  Josh Apr 23 '12 at 18:00

It's because every time you do a loop, you assign a new function to [image].onload, overwriting the previous one. That's how you end up with only three images. This should work:

if (rand == 1) {
    grass.addEventlistener('load', drawCanvasImage(ctx,grass,x,y), false);
} else if (rand == 2) {
    sea.addEventlistener('load', drawCanvasImage(ctx,sea,x,y), false);
} else {
    woods.addEventlistener('load', drawCanvasImage(ctx,woods,x,y), false);
}

Here you just add a new listener for every loop.

share|improve this answer
    
That worked. But I have no idea why. How is this bypassing the problem I had? Is there a better way to do this overall? –  Josh Apr 22 '12 at 18:10
    
@Josh see my answer for the why. –  Manishearth Apr 22 '12 at 18:19

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