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I've the following piece of code for copying one associative array to other,

<script>

var some_db = new Array();

some_db["One"] = "1";

some_db["Two"] = "2";

some_db["Three"] = "3";

var copy_db = new Array();

alert(some_db["One"]);

copy_db = some_db.slice();

alert(copy_db["One"]);


</script>

But the second alert says "undefined".. Am I doing something wrong here? Any pointers please..

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4  
There are no associative arrays in javascript. –  Niko Apr 22 '12 at 18:16
5  
JavaScript arrays don't work with non-numerical keys. That's why .slice does not pick them up. Use a plain object instead and then look at What is the most efficient way to clone a JavaScript object?. –  Felix Kling Apr 22 '12 at 18:17
1  
@Niko: Arrays are objects from the beginning... they are not "turned". –  Felix Kling Apr 22 '12 at 18:19
    
@FelixKling Thanks, I missed that. Corrected my comment. –  Niko Apr 22 '12 at 18:20
    
@Peter - You really should accept some answers on your questions before asking more of them. –  gnarf Apr 22 '12 at 18:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In JavaScript associative arrays are called objects.

<script>

var some_db = {        
   "One" : "1",    
   "Two" : "2",    
   "Three" : "3"    
};

var copy_db = clone(some_db);

alert(some_db["One"]);

alert(copy_db["One"]);    

function clone(obj) {
    if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;
    var copy = obj.constructor();
    for (var attr in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = clone(obj[attr]);
    }
    return copy;
}

</script>

I would normally use var copy_db = $.extend({}, some_db); if I was using jQuery.

Fiddle Proof: http://jsfiddle.net/RNF5T/

Thanks @maja.

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2  
This is not creating a copy... –  Felix Kling Apr 22 '12 at 18:25
    
@FelixKling Thanks duh. Fixed. –  iambriansreed Apr 22 '12 at 18:27
    
Notice, that the function does not copy child-objects –  maja Dec 2 '13 at 14:46
    
@maja Yes it does, see fiddle: jsfiddle.net/36fbL –  iambriansreed Dec 2 '13 at 15:02
    
@iambriansreed No, it does not. You would need to call your clone-Function again, when assigning an attribute. See your updated fiddle: jsfiddle.net/85Gbr This would perform a deep-copy: jsfiddle.net/RNF5T –  maja Dec 2 '13 at 15:09

As @Niko says in the comment, there are no associative arrays in JavaScript.

You are actually setting properties on the array object, which is not a very good idea. You would be better off using an actual object.

var some_db = {};
some_db["One"] = "1";
some_db["Two"] = "2";
some_db["Three"] = "3";

var copy_db = {}, prop;
// loop over all the keys in the object
for ( prop in some_db ) {
  // make sure the object has this value, and not its prototype
  if ( some_db.hasOwnProperty( prop ) ) {
    copy_db[ prop ] = some_db[ prop ];
  }
}

Many libraries implement an extend function which does exactly this ( copy keys from one object to another). Most notably jQuery and underscore.js. Underscore also has _.clone( obj ) which is effectively _.extend( {}, obj )

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if you want to use JSON, you can take this 'associative array' object:

var assArray = {zero:0,one:1,two:2,three:3,what:'ever',you:'want'};

and 'clone' it like this:

var clonedObj = JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(assArray));

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underscore.clone (http://underscorejs.org/#clone) could help. It performs shallow copy to the dictionary object or array.

var some_db = {        
  "One" : "1",    
  "Two" : "2",    
  "Three" : "3"    
};

copy_db = _.clone(some_db);
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