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I am trying to write a navigation for my web app in JSF.

I have this, so far:

<ul>
<ui:repeat value="#{pageBean.getPages()}" var="page">
   <li class="#{(pageContext.request.requestURI.endsWith(page.url)) ? 'current_page_item' : '' }">
       <a href="#{pageContext.servletContext.getRealPath(page.url)}">#{page.name}</a>
   </li>
</ui:repeat>
</ul>

But anchor's href attribute is always empty. Also I am not sure if pageContext.request.requestURI.endsWith(page.url) works correctly - I guess not, because no page has current_page_item class.

What am I doing wrong?

Thank you!

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Are you using JSF 2.0? –  Matt Handy Apr 22 '12 at 19:41
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The getRealPath() indeed doesn't do what you think it does. Read its javadoc.

But this approach is unnecessarily overcomplicated. You don't need to generate an absolute path yourself if you use the JSF <h:link> component in combination with a list of view IDs. The <h:link> will automatically prepend the right context path, if any.

<ul>
    <ui:repeat value="#{pageBean.pages}" var="page">
        <li class="#{view.viewId == page.viewId ? 'current_page_item' : ''}">
            <h:link value="#{page.name}" outcome="#{page.viewId}" />
        </li>
    </ui:repeat>
</ul>

The view ID is exactly the page identifier which JSF uses under its covers to locate views and handle navigation. The view ID is the webcontent-relative path to the view file, such as /foo/index.xhtml.

Note that the #{view} in the above example is an implicit EL variable pointing to the current UIViewRoot, so you don't need to create/prepare it yourself.

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Works perfectly! Thank you –  jakubka Apr 22 '12 at 22:20
    
You're welcome. –  BalusC Apr 22 '12 at 22:35
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This is a misunderstanding of what getRealPath does. This will translate a URL of the form http://<host>:<port>/<contextPath>/index.html to something like C:\foo\bar\index.html. Remote systems have no use for this information. The method returns null for resources that don't correspond to files. The method is mostly useless and applications should avoid using it.

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