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Typically in JavaScript I do something like the below to verify an element does exist:

if (document.getElementById('lblUpdateStatus')) {
    $("#lblUpdateStatus").text("");
}

But, using jQuery - how can I do the same type of thing?

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Dupe: stackoverflow.com/questions/950563/… –  karim79 Jun 22 '09 at 13:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The get method returns the matched DOM elements:

if($("#lblUpdateStatus").get(0)){
    $("#lblUpdateStatus").click(function () { ... });
}

but I am not sure if it is a fast method.

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$ returns an array of matching elements, so check the length property and you're good to go

if ($('#lblUpdateStatus').length) {
    $("#lblUpdateStatus").text("");
}
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The thing is that the jQuery will only do the requested action if the element exists :-), so you only need:

$("#lblUpdateStatus").text("");
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I see no reason to use jQuery just for the sake of it. the $('#lblUpdateStatus') will basically go straight to document.getElementById('lblUpdateStatus'), as the selector has an anchor in it, so you're not really gaining anything. Also, for just checking if the DOM object exists, wrapping it in a jQuery object will create quite a lot of overhead.

On the other hand, if just changing the text property of the object is what you want to do, you don't need to check for its existence if you use jQuery.

if (document.getElementById('lblUpdateStatus')) {
    $("#lblUpdateStatus").text("");
}

will do the exact same thing as having just

$("#lblUpdateStatus").text("");
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document.getElementById('lblUpdateStatus') reads better too. –  Kieran Jul 27 '12 at 7:09
1  
it is much quicker like you say jsperf.com/test-dom-selector –  Kieran Jul 27 '12 at 7:15
1  
@Kieran: document.getElementById('lblUpdateStatus') might be easier to read (I don't think so, but I guess it's a matter of habit), but you risk running into null reference errors if you try to do something with whatever that statement returns, and there is no such element on the page. The jQuery method will in that case just silently do nothing (which might or might not be what the OP intended...) –  Tomas Lycken Jul 29 '12 at 15:36
    
Yep it will return null if it is not there. I am not sure what tests the OP wanted either, –  Kieran Jul 29 '12 at 23:14
    
For the sake of common patterns and implementations. If you co mingle vanilla js and jquery to accomplish similar tasks your code base will be terrible. The speed difference is not noticeable 98% of the time. Additionally there is the underlying cross browser support you get with jquery. Are you going to write multiple lines of vanilla js to support all browsers just to get a millisecond of performance over a single line of jquery? And as mentioned you would have to also check for nulls, so you get more out of a single line of jquery over vanilla js. –  JBeckton Mar 11 '14 at 21:24

From jQuery 1.4 onwards you can use $.contains().

var test = $("<div>");
$.contains(window.document, test[0]);  // false

$("body").append(test);
$.contains(window.document, test[0]);  // true
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The other answers work for the question asked, but this is the only one that works if you want to check whether an old element that you have a reference to still exists in the dom. –  jstaab Jul 14 '14 at 21:06

I wrote a post about that on my blog

if ( $('#element_id').length > 0 )
   console.log('the element with element_id exists in the DOM');
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Which is the same as if ($('#element_id').length) { console.log('the element with element_id exists in the DOM'); } (Essentially DanF's answer above.) –  Nosredna Nov 30 '09 at 20:08

If HTML string can be passed into $(), you can use parent.length:

$('<div>').length // 1, but it not exist on page

but

$('<div>').parent().length // 0
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